Episode 445 – CEO of Quadratec Steals The Show!


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This episode of the Jeep talk show is brought to you in part by Quadratec.com. Quadratec has delivered quality products and expert advice to Jeep enthusiasts around the world for more than 30 years. All the top brands at the best prices. Visit Quadratec.com to satisfy your Jeep needs today! Quadratec was founded over 30 years ago to provide Jeep enthusiasts with the best products at the best prices, and today it is the world’s largest independent retailer of Jeep parts and accessories. Whether you own a Willys, Wrangler, Cherokee or anything in between, Quadratec has what you need for whatever you drive. With more products than you’ll find anywhere else at the best value, Quadratec is your number one resource for everything Jeep. Visit Quadratec.com today!

This Week In Jeep: 

Proper Justice

You’ve undoubtedly heard the phrase lately “we are living in strange times.” And despite living in a city whose official bumper sticker reads “Keep Portland Weird” … I see even stranger stuff more and more every time I turn on the TV or radio. It used to be that when you saw someone on the freeway …they were trying to commit suicide, since in every single city in the entire nation it is illegal for you to just walk onto a freeway. If you were there, it was clear your only intent was to kill yourself by jumping in front of a dump truck or something. So when I see people being completely retarded by doing something as stupid as try and take their tiny little temper tantrum, I mean protest  onto the freeway, I’m blown away when people are shocked they get struck and killed by the high speed machines that lawfully occupy these roadways. But a small itty bitty bit of my faith in the justice system has been restored this week when I hear about the charges being dropped against the Jeeper who used his vehicle to push stupid protesters out of the roadway where they were illegally blocking traffic. My only complaint is he didn’t warm the tires up with a little heel-toe action beforehand. More than a month after the incident took place at this Visalia Commiefornia Black Lives Matter protest, Tulare County district attorney officials say the driver acted out of fear for his safety. Witnesses at the protest say they’re both shocked and angry at the outcome. (Gee, didn’t see that coming.) I mean if you’re stupid enough to think that it’s ok to march out onto a highway and start hitting people’s vehicles chanting and yelling your war cry, then you prob are the same kind of person who would be shocked that a gun shot a bullet into you as you looked down the barrel and pulled the trigger.  The District Attorney’s office said in a statement multiple protesters were on the road, illegally blocking the Jeep and other vehicles on the roadway. Attorneys say the protesters made it impossible for the driver to move forward without contacting them, and after doing so, they later went to the Visalia police department to report the collision. To me this sounds more like a responsible citizen concerned for the law, and the safety and well being of the mob who had started to surround him and throw objects into the roofless vehicle, than a ruthless racists intent on pulling off a hit and run. There is a flurry of legal-speak surrounding this case, and although the DA considers the matter closed, there are those who just can’t let their butt-hurt go because their feelings are more important than the law. 

So Just How Dumb Do You Have To Be?

So apparently Jeep and FCA have determined that not only are you too stupid or lazy to stay in your own lane, or brake properly in your new Jeep you are also too dumb to read a tire gauge. I don’t know about you, but I learned how to count at a pretty young age, and although reading a dial or the stick of a pressure gauge isn’t something they teach in grade school, it’s not that hard to figure out what the numbers mean. So as I’m going through the specs for the 2021 Wrangler this week, I have to stop and facepalm as I see that FCA is incorporating a whole suite of previously optional tech into the lower trim models. And they’re upping the ante for the new model year.. In addition to “we’re going to insult your intelligence as a competent driver” tech like blind spot monitoring for those too damn lazy to rotate their head 30 degrees, and forward collision warning for those more interested in looking in the back seat instead of forward, we now have the first offroad tech for you too stupid to properly air up your tires after a day on the sand snow or trail. ORDINARILY, one would air up using an on board air compressor, or compressed air tank of some kind. Heck, even the gas station down the road could air you up, and all you need on hand to make sure you’re properly inflated is one of those air gauge things. But those are way too complicated to operate,and who has the time to learn how anyways? Don’t you need a degree or certification to use those?  No. And you are stupid. Or at least the engineers at FCA think you are.  Now as of the 2021 model year, all Wranglers equipped with the 7.0-inch touchscreen, will also have a special tire-fill alert system built into the vehicle’s programming. Working in conjunction with the sensors in the TPMS, or tire pressure monitoring system, or as I like to call it the “you’re too oblivious to realize you’ve been driving on a flat tire since you pulled out of the driveway light.” This fancy new super helpful feature will honk the horn at you once when the optimal tire pressure has been reached when you’re topping off your tires, and three times when the pressure is too high or too low.  Ahh I can see it now, it’s been an awesome day on the trail, you didn’t even have to touch the wheel or the pedals once, your jeep did it all for you, but now you have to air up your tires, and you’re going to get confused as all the other Jeeps in the staging area are all airing up at the same time… and nobody can figure out how much air they have because everyone else’s horn keeps going off. BOO-HOO I’m so utterly sick of this level of babysitting that the automotive engineering field has insisted be adopted into every new vehicle that hits the road.  Pretty soon, there WILL be a Jeep with no steering wheel, and an electric vehicles only sign hanging over the gatekeeper at the Rubicon, and at that point, screw it!  ….I’m leaving the planet.

Tech Talk With Jeep Talk:

Hard-Wiring An Accessory.

There’s nothing more off putting than looking into a bad ass Jeep and seeing 17 cigarette lighter splitters sitting in the center console with a dozen power cables strung all over the place. I know that not everyone is or can be a wiring expert, but there is little excuse for poor wire management. Mostly all we have now is a power cable for our cell phone. But oftentimes there’s an accessory that you just can’t live without that needs power. It could be that Valentine-1 radar detector, or one of those inclinometers that are backlit and need their own power supply. Maybe it’s just that GPS unit that you cant live without. Whatever it may be, it’s time to get that power cable off of the dash and out of the way of everything else. The term for this is called Hard-Wiring.  And even though it’s not difficult there are a few rules that must be followed regardless of what you’re working with. First off, this is going to involve cutting that power cable, taking off that cigarette lighter adapter, and wiring the cable straight into the Jeeps power systems. That little black cable is then a lot easier to snake in through small passages without that big bulbous plug on the end of it. NOW it can get tucked under trim along the dash. Once you’re behind the dash you can tap into the ignition, the fuse panel, the back of an auxiliary power port, or even better give it it’s own run straight to the battery. No matter where you pull power from, make sure it’s keyed, meaning it turns off when the key is pulled out of the ignition. And rule number 1? Fuse it! No matter where you get the power from, it needs to be protected, so along with the necessary supplies needed to tap into a wire or hook up to the battery, you will need an inline fuse holder to protect your device and the vehicle’s wiring. If you’re hesitant or unsure of what you’re doing, then leave it to the pros. Most shops will do something like this for virtually any device for about $20 to $30 in labor and a small supplies charge for connectors, fuse and fuse holder. OR you can buy a spare power cable from online in case you screw something up. Sometimes the wire will have to be extended, and this will require additional wire, and possibly solder or additional connectors. Ok, so how do you determine what wire is power and what wire is ground once you cut the power cable? Here’s a hint, the center position on the cigarette lighter adapter, the plug that goes into the hoe in your dash will always have the center pin be positive. That’s the way every cigarette lighter or 12v power port has ever been made. Using a multimeter set for continuity, probe the center pin on the plug, and then each of the wires in turn to find which one is the center pin. This is the wire in the cable that will get hooked to your 12v positive source. The other by process of elimination is ground. Make sure you are not tying into things like light circuits, or critical systems like the fuel pump. With a little no-how some basic and inexpensive supplies, you can clean up that over crowded power port or cigarette lighter in your Jeep or any other vehicle for that matter.

Interview with:

Ted Wentz – Quadratec

Ted Wentz grew up in the family business, Quadratec, and is a lifelong Jeep and automotive enthusiast. Quadratec was founded 30 years ago by Ted’s father. Ted got an early start in the automotive industry, pushing a broom around the Quadratec warehouse. To expand his professional and entrepreneurial experience, he spent several years working for the Department of Homeland Security and then starting his own venture, FireCraft, a BBQ grills and accessories manufacturer and retailer. Ted returned to Quadratec in 2017 and currently serves as CEO. He was elected to the SEMA Board of Directors in June 2020.

Must Have Stuff: 

Action Camera – Just Get One Already!

If you’ve spent any amount of time on off road related forums there is one phrase that gets typed a lot when someone is bragging about something they did with their JEeps. And that is…. “Pics or it didn’t happen” There;s not much worse than leaving the house and realizing your phone is still on the counter. Our phones have become our lives, and it sux even worse when you realize that single device is the only means you have of recording your adventures. It used to be if you wanted those cool below the Jeep shots as you crawl over an obstacle or those wide sweeping views of the trail as you roar over some rocks that you either had to have a professional camera crew with you, or you spent hundreds of dollars on action cameras  like a GoPro. Those cute but extremely powerful cube cameras have become very popular over the years and now that they’ve been out for a while, the prices have come way down and there is plenty of competition. Oh sure you could easily drop $3k in an offroad camera rig, with a 3 axis active stabilizing gimbal and enough frames per second to choke a super computer in processing. But it’s really not needed. Now you can get gopro like performance for a fraction of the price and have a dozen varieties to choose from. So this week i’m not going to give you one specific brand or model of thing to go after. Instead I want you to make a commitment to yourself and the rest of the Jeep world that you are going to make the summer of 2020 the year you finally get an action camera for your Jeep. Get a mount for the dash, get one for the bumper, get a suction cup mount for the side, and a bogh clamp mount for the roll bar. You don’t have to spend a fortune to get good footage, but it helps to have a few accessories. Although I’m not giving you one particular selection to go buy I will tell you to look out for a few features that will help set things apart for you. First, Get an extra battery, no matter what, you’re going to use it. Second, make sure the camera you’re getting has an app that is compatible with your phone. Being able to mount the camera in a remote location and then start, stop and monitor your footage is incredibly useful. Also, make sure that it can at least do a full 1080p with 120 frames per second. That’s going to be the mark to reach for clarity of shot, and ability to have some good smooth slow motion shots if it came down to it. But honestly, you can get a waterproof 4k action camera with a case for under $50 on amazon and have it here in two days if you want, so why not right? And that’s about it, if you can’t find a decent accessory package to go along with the camera you’re looking at, move on to another one. You’ll want one with at least a little bit of support behind it to make your offroad video making a little easier and more enjoyable. When you get home there are a ton of free, very easy to learn and use video editing programs out there to put the final touches on it, edit out the boring spots or where you had to pull cable, and get it posted up to youtube or your social media accounts. It’s never been easier or cheaper to get great Jeeping videos without having to rely on your cell phone.

Links Mentioned in this Episode: 445

https://www.quadratec.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Quadratec
https://www.youtube.com/quadratec
https://www.instagram.com/quadratec/
https://jeeptalkshow.com/

Video mentioned in the show:

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Episode 444 – Could You Give Your Jeep Away?


This Week In Jeep: 

Another Six Figure Jeep – With WHAT?!?

I’m not a huge fan of baseball. (gasp) I know… I know…, I might as well have just insulted half of America. But if you are of the countless few who still love the sport, then you may undoubtedly be aware of The New York Yankees relief pitcher Aroldis Chapman. They call him a closer. Because he closes the game down with his 100mph fastballs, and is known as “The Cuban Missile” for being able to bring such a fast pitch. Clearly if you’re on a team like the Yankees, and you’ve got a name with the word missile in it, then it’s safe to say you’re also getting a pretty fat paycheck.  And it became quite evident that Chapman IS getting paid quite well, as this week he took delivery of one of those 6 wheeled, six figure Jeeps from a company we’ve talked about recently here on the show. Just 10 Episodes ago in fact. In Episode 434 we Talked about South Florida Jeeps in Fort Lauderdale, who now apparently have created a one of a kind custom 6×6 Jeep for the baseball player. As stated on the Instagram post of the delivery from South Florida Jeeps, ((QUOTE)) “The man who regularly throws over a 100 mph now has a truck to match.” And a truck this thing is, as each one of the SF6X6’s are hand built to order with a baseline of 600 ft pounds of torque and a bunch of other quite impressive features to come with that impressive price tag. But this one has been custom outfitted with a unique Kevlar coating. Is it bullet proof? Radar Absorbing? Will it deflect a rocket strike? They won’t say, and some of the specs of the beasts this shop builds are kept under tight wraps too. All in All the project took about 60 days to complete. What it cost Chapman was right around $150,000 — a small price to pay for a Jeeper who just signed a 3-year, $48 MILLION contract with the New York Yankees. Yea, how’s about he kicks one our way?!?! …Since it was probably US who gave him the idea after hearing about it on the show in the first place! Hey YOU do the math. That was exactly 70 days ago, and it took 60 days to build, and he took delivery this week. Like Pee-Wee Herman used to say… “CONNECT THE DOTS LA-LA-LA”  

Teen shot dead in a Jeep in Seattle’s CHOP (Capitol Hill Occupied Protest)

The teenagers shot in Seattle’s Capitol Hill Organized Protest area earlier this week were being chased after stealing a Jeep at knifepoint. According to various reports from both eye witnesses as well as people who were close to the two young men who were shot, a slightly different story comes to light. Initially dispatchers received multiple 911 calls after gunfire erupted just after 3 a.m. near 12th Avenue and Pike Street, according to Seattle Police. Witnesses reported several unidentified people had fired shots into an SUV. Well on the surface that seems like the two young boys in the Jeep were tragic victims of senseless violence. But as the story unfolds, we find that apparently the two boys, one 16, and the other 14, had beat someone up, and stolen their Jeep at knife point. They were being chased at one point, and got advice from one of their friends to run to this CHOP zone where they would be safe and could hide out because there were no police up there. Once there there was some confusion since the six block area of anarchy was at that point being self policed. According to one witness a vehicle that had the word “Security” written on the side of it was one that had engaged the two boys as they recklessly drove into this area of high tension and lawlessness. To me it comes as little surprise, and it’s going to piss a lot of people off when I say they got what they deserved. You beat someone up and steal their Jeep from them at knife point and then go carening into an area of sheer anarchy and expect there to be something other than bullets greeting you, then I’m afraid that falls under the you sleep in the bed you make category. Friends of the thieves insist they were not gang members, yet have already been identified and are known to regularly associate with known blood gang members. They thought that there was honor among thieves and that if they made it to an area with other people who are circumventing the law, that they would be safe. The moral of the story? Don’t steal Jeeps!  

Tech Talk With Jeep Talk:

Tighten That Tire!

As summer creeps up on us we find ourselves hitting the trail a little more often, and that might mean you may be noticing some things that developed over the winter or from last year’s trail runs that has you thinking you need to make repairs. All too often a new creak or rattle has us worrying more than we should. This is especially true for those of us Jeepers who have a spare tire carrier bumper.  Aftermarket bumpers are great but they all have their own quirks and flaws. In my mind no bumper is perfect, even the one that a buddy of mine is building that he will eventually have sunk over $2500 into. And I bet when it’s finally done, he still won’t be happy. Over time, trail use and just general driving loosen up tolerances that may have otherwise been tight at one point. This may introduce a little slop in something and present a new rattle or noise that is sometimes hard to isolate. Spare tire carrier bumpers are notorious for making noise, especially on the trail. From rattles to bangs and everything in between I know for a fact there are Jeepers out there right now wishing they could do something to quiet down their rear tire carrier.  One of the biggest sources of noise in these bumpers is from the tire itself. And the bigger the tire, the bigger the culprit. The sheer mass and size of that tire being suspended just inches above the main support of the bumper is exerting a lot of shear forces on its mount, which is oftentimes just a 10″ ring of steel with three lugs sticking out of it welding to a piece of tube steel. As you bounce down the trail all those forces are being transmitted through that mount and are turned into rattles in all those areas where tolerances may have opened up a bit. This is a tip that a friend of the show CPO turned me onto a number of years back. And that’s to get that tire secured to the rear supports of the swing arm. Almost every rear tire carrier bumper I’ve seen has a vertical post for the spare tire mount itself, as well as at least one triangulated support that comes off the side, but usually two. And it’s where this angled tube meets the face of the tire is where support needs to be maximized.  How this is done is by using anything from rubber exhaust hangers, to bump stops, to a section of an old tire or anything that can fill that void, and give you a mountable, securable and very rugged cushion to cinch the tire down to. This will create a much more positive engagement between the tire and the bumper making them much more of a single mass than several masses all vibrating and shaking differently. The key here is durability, but you will be limited to how much of a void you need to fill. A chunk of floor matt zip tied around the support might be all you need. Or it may be that you need a full size bump stop bolted to the face of that support because your tire sits so far out from it. Rattles aren’t the end of the world, but they are a sign of something that still needs to be addressed.

Newbie Nuggets:

At some point you may run into a situation that requires a Band-Aid and maybe even a little first aid on the trail. In episode 426 I discussed several items to have in the jeep including a first aid kit. The question has come up, what’s kind of a first aid kit do I need? Great question and thanks for suggesting as we explore some options. Most first aid kits available might be the blue metal box that says “first aid with a big red cross” or the white plastic box that says First Aid and they contain basic essential items that are generally enough to handle those silly scrapes and bumps you can acquire while jeeping. Here is a list of items that should be in the basic kit. 1)  Band-Aids – all sizes (small to large & wide) 2)  Dressing gauze with tape 3)  Flexible gauze (ace bandage) 4)  Antiseptic wipes 5)  First aid cream/Neosporin 6)  Alcohol swabs 7)  Some kits may have a triangular bandage and a cold pack Now you may ask yourself, why would I need all this first aid stuff? Well, when you jeep, things tend to happen and it’s always best to be prepared. My husband always says, “Better to be looking at it, than looking for it”. Or as I always say, “if I have it, I won’t need it”. Needing a bandage is NOT the time to wish you had put a kit together. We were jeeping last weekend on John Bull with Don Alexander and helping some students get through the obstacles. The rocks are huge and the dirt is like powder and very slippery. I know this and mentioned and reminded the drivers to be careful when stepping/walking around before we tackled the obstacles. Well as I was spotting a driver through the obstacle, I needed to adjust my position and I hopped (yes I said hopped) to the next rock and as my left foot landed it went down and “swoosh” I’m on the ground. Landed hard on my left hip and elbow/forearm on a slanted rock covered in fine dirt. I know better, but why I hopped and didn’t step as I moved is beyond me. As I hit the ground I realized that the driver was still waiting for me to help and I sprang up like a gazelle (it was more like “I meant to do that”) and continued like nothing had happened. Turns out I scraped my forearm pretty good. No blood and I didn’t hit my head so we continued on and I got everyone else through the obstacle. A little bit later I realized I had a pretty good scrape and it was stinging. I used the first aid cream and a Band-Aid to help the pain and put my big girl britches on and dealt with it. I probably didn’t really need the Band-Aid but having it was good because you never know when something like this could have been worse. So what other types of first aid kits are out there? Basic kits are easy to find and generally require very little to figure out how to use the items. There is always a basic first aid booklet in these kits, so it’s a good idea to preview it before going on a trial run. But what about other types of kits and items. There is every level of kit (and expense) from Trauma kits to full blown medic kits. Depending on your experience and/or training you may want to bring additional items in your kit. Bill and I are first aid, CPR, trauma trained and certified, so we carry extra kits on board.   A few other items to consider: SunBurn cream, it’s not just for sunburns, you could get a burn reaching under your hood and touching the hot engine or exhaust. An Israeli pressure bandage would be good to have for a puncture or head wound or even a deep cut on a leg/arm (learn to use it properly).  A wound like this could easily happen by wrenching under the jeep and the tool slips, or you fall on a jagged rock and hit your head or worse. Whatever you choose for your first aid kit, make sure you know what’s inside and how to use it, especially, if you are the trail leader. There are classes offered for all levels of first aid and trauma training. You need to know how to help if needed. And don’t forget to check the kit for missing items just to make sure kids and family members haven’t raided the kit because they needed a Band-Aid.  Josh, and Tony, what’s a must have for your first aid kit?

Interview with:

Dr. Pamela L. Gay – Donated Her “beloved” 1997 Jeep Wrangler To NPR after 21 years of fun and adventures! Dr Pamela Gay is an astronomer and host of the Daily Space podcast. She is also someone who owned a Jeep Wrangler SE “manual” for 21 years. In that time she has done many jeep things both scientific (like lugging telescopes) and stupid (like transporting a love seat roped in between the roll bars). She just donated her beloved Jeep to NPR and remains in mourning.

Must Have Stuff:

Carabiners For Wrench Control / Storage

I used to work with tools for a living. And keeping my tools clean and organized was a key part of my routine. This has transferred to the tools I carry offroad too. And although not everyone can have a dedicated set of tools just for the Jeep or for offroading, this tip will help anyone organize a specific set of tools in their collection. Having access to the right tool for a trail repair or last minute adjustment of something makes all the difference in the world. So why carry a full set of wrenches with you if it’s going to take you forever to find the right one? To this end I have used a simple Carabiner to keep each of my wrench sets complete and organized.  Long gone are the days of searching endlessly through a tool box or bag to find one single wrench. I know right where my wrenches are and the one I’m looking for will always be easy to find. My quick tip for you would be to keep it simple stupid. Seriously. You can go out and spend as much as $40 on a pair of these spring clips and get them home only to find they don’t fit but a third of your wrenches. Oh sure they will be titanium coated and have an integrated bottle opener and bluetooth link to feed real time tool data to the cloud for better storage optimization, as if that’s even a thing. Honestly the cheap anodized NON-locking aluminum clips that you can get several of for less than 10 bucks works the best. And here’s why.The ones you want to look for will have a round body and clip that sets flush with the body. Not some big chunky twist or sliding locking mechanism. That’s just going to get in the way. Just a simple spring loaded lock tab of the same diameter as the rest of the carabiner. This will allow for easy cycling through the wrenches to find the right one, but will also facilitate easy removal and replacement of the needed wrench. Not to mention it’s nice having a different anodization to tell which set is metric at a glance. The bigger the Carabiner the bigger the diameter of the body, so you don’t want anything over a 4″ clip because you won’t be able to get your smaller wrenches over the body. Other than that it’s up to you where you get them, how much you spend and how many you buy. I will say this though. Stay away from the Pittsburgh brand Wrench Rings. Although they look like they might be a better design, they are made of a soft steel and bend out of shape too easily. Think old school shower curtain rings, stretched. Yea, not a lot of beef there. 

Amazon $7.49 for (QTY 6) 3″ Multi Colored – https://amzn.to/3dVinQG
Amazon $11.99 for (QTY 12) 3″ Black – https://amzn.to/3dViZps
Harbor Freight $0.89 for (QTY 1) comes in various colors https://www.harborfreight.com/3-inch-snap-clip-fastener-47658.html

Campfire Side Chat:

Do You Have The Means To Fly a Flag (or two) On YOUR Jeep? What Flags Do You Fly, And When?

Wheeling Where:

July 4th Jeep Rally WILL HAPPEN!

In the parking lot of Apache Field – Gonzales, Texas
6pm July 4th, 2020
Event coordinators encourage Jeeo owners to decorate their vehicles with Independence Day themed decorations, including but not limited to flags, streamers, window paint, lights, etc.The rally is intended to uplift Gonzales and its residents, and help give the town some life and hope to remain strong. Organized by Lisa Brown, who previously worked on the Light Up the Dark Christmas Light event.

Links Mentioned in this Episode: 

Jeep 4-1-1 https://www.youtube.com/user/backcountrydriver
Jeep Spare Tire Carrier Flag Carrier (Freedom Flyer) https://oldsoldierironworks.com/
Zippered Flag Holder For CB Antenna “Forever Wave” https://foreverwave.com/

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Episode 443 – YOU Create The Next Jeep Easter Egg!

This Week In Jeep: 

I’ll Give Them an “A” For Effort…

Just what on earth would cause a Wrangler, a Raptor and a $300K sport boat all to sink in one afternoon? …”hold muh beer – I got this” In all seriousness it was a scene straight out of a Disney Goofy movie or perhaps a modern day remake of the three stooges. In any case, Cedar Lake, Indianna was the place to be to catch this S-show as it unfolded. They say the road to hell is paved with best intentions, and I’m sure it was in the best of intentions when Cedar Lake suddenly found itself to be more of a parking lot than a body of water. Apparently a rather rich but not too bright family attempted to rescue their sinking boat by using the family vehicles according to emergency personnel Saturday evening. We are told the owner did not bring his helicopter out to assist. That may prove to have been the biggest mistake of all, and there’s plenty to go around. The owner of the vehicles and boat is now in deep trouble with the Indiana Conservation Police and The Cedar Lake Fire Department Marine Unit too. While their insurance company isn’t likely too happy either, it’s also possible that the state of Indiana may have a word or two for them as well.  Cedar Lake is a state-owned body of water, and driving one vehicle (let alone two) into it is a no-go. Pair that with the potential for oil pollution and you’ve got an even stickier situation than what you see on the surface. …which is two floating trucks and a sinking boat.  You see, when you’re too rich to have enough smarts to remember the transom plug for your super expensive high performance super boat as you put it into the water, I can honestly say that it doesn’t take millions of dollars to have two brain cells to rub together to realize that maybe driving your tricked out ford raptor down the boat ramp and into the water to save said boat, now karmically sinking into the lake it was so haphazardly launched into, isn’t the brightest of ideas… and you got what you deserved. I would even go WAY out on a limb and venture to say that any number of you listening right now wouldn’t need a seven figure income or a bottomless trust fund to realize that it might also be a bad idea to then grab your even more tricked out Jeep Wrangler and drive IT into the water to attempt to save either the boat or the raptor because there’s no way in hell you’re stupid enough to think that you honestly had a chance at saving both… did you?…oh god you were! Maybe I’m missing something. I personally happen to have it on good authority that installing a lift kit and large off road tires, does not make your Jeep float like a boat, or turn your ford raptor into a marine recovery vehicle. But perhaps I installed mine wrong, I dunno. It seems I’m seeing more and more stupidity of this level these days, as more and more trust fund babies are becoming YouTube stars by doing stupid shit. Or to them it’s acting normal on a Tuesday. Yes, please, take this one of a kind six figure Jeep and then jump it off a motocross ramp, bounce the engine of the rev limiter until you see smoke spewing out the tailpipe, and burn out that transfer case as you do endless 4 wheel burnouts before laughing hysterically as the engine that you spent tens of thousands of dollars on seize up like bear trap on a deer leg. I don’t know about you, but that’s going to be a no good very bad day when my Jeep sinks into a lake, but for people like this who have more money than sense, it just goes to show that even owning a Jeep doesn’t make you smart enough to know how to use one. Unfortunately it’s people like this that give Jeepers and off road enthusiasts alike a bad name. What’s more unfortunate is that despite what is likely a half million dollar insurance claim, and who knows what sort of environmental fines, these people will be back at this kind of douchebaggery in no time with nary a lesson learned. I guess for the rest of us, people like you and me, it’s just more entertainment and a reason to shake our head and not give these idiots the attention they are so desperate to receive.

Want To Be The Creator Of The Next Jeep Easter Egg?

The parent company to Jeep, FCA is giving Jeep owners and fans alike the opportunity to create the next “Easter Egg” to hide on a future Jeep model. As if bragging rights like that aren’t enough, along with your idea going to the production line, you will also get the chance to win a new Jeep vehicle. For those who have been living under a rock for the last 75 years, “Easter Eggs” in the automotive context are unpublicized style elements hidden on vehicles, and have been around since Willy’s was on the battlefield. So for all you thinking you just discovered the lost treasure of Atlantis by finding a pair of flip flops, a gecko, or spider web…. you need to calm your neglected and overly sheltered ass down. You’re not special and most of us have known about many of these for several years. Hell, even I reported on the easter eggs on the new Cherokee before it even came out, and that was like 6 years ago. From little images of Jeep grilles to the three digits “419,” or a 1941 Jeep Willys driving up a mountain, Jeep fans around the world are discovering the Easter eggs hidden on their vehicles, then posting their finds on social media like they are the first ever. It’s comical and to this seasoned Jeeper a little sad. But, If you think you have the right idea, the right design or uniquely clever concept for the next generation of Jeep Easter Eggs, then you need to hurry up, slacker. The contest runs through July 2 (thats a week from when this was recorded) and ideas can be submitted at www.TheNextJeepEasterEgg.com The judging panel includes Jeep brand executives and designers but oddly enough no one from The Jeep Talk Show made it to the Judging panel. And we’re pretty sure they got the memo. The winner will be announced July 31 and will receive a new Jeep vehicle of their choice as the grand prize. And for those who grew up thinking that everyone is a winner…? Well they’re not. There’s only one winner in this contest, and if you don’t get the Jeep, guess what, you lost. So suck it up buttercup, put on your big kid pants and join the rest of us in embracing mediocrity. In the meantime if you want to see all the Jeep Easter Eggs for yourself, just look for the millennial in a parking lot or driveway holding their phone the wrong way in front of their jeep acting like they just won the lottery.

Tech Talk With Jeep Talk:

What is that Flappy-Buzzing-Popping Sound Coming From My Speakers?

Many of us (who are now a little hard of hearing) have been there. Too many times, judging by the ringing in my ear. You know what I’m talking about. The sun was out, you got off early on a friday and you just got a raise. You’re driving down the road, and all the lights are green when suddenly one of your favorite songs comes on, and you just HAVE to crank it to 11. The problem is that we all HAVE been there too many times, and for some of us, our stereo’s don’t sound the same anymore. Maybe there was a big “POP” ..and now nothing in the audio system works. Maybe it’s just that one speaker that is constantly making noise now, or the sound bar quit on you. Any number of issues can arise when a speaker blows and sometimes it’s a lot more than a voice coil that just fried. Speakers are a wonderful invention and the technology behind them is still making advancements 144 years after their invention. Speakers can blow for any number of reasons, and there are all sorts of states of  a blown speaker. Just because a speaker blows doesn’t mean it stops working. If this has happened to you, don’t worry, its not the end of the world, but if you have a speaker making noise, it may not necessarily be blown either. It’s been a little while since we’ve touched bases on the audio side of the electronics of our Jeeps. Oh sure we spend plenty of time talking about double din head units, alarms, and auxiliary lighting with cool switches. But we’ve been neglecting the one thing that gets used almost as much as the ignition in our Jeeps and that’s the audio system. I’m going to focus on the speakers for today though, and talk about some of the things that can cause a speaker to make a funny noise and what to do about it. If the system is shut down completely, meaning there’s not even a display on the stereo, then chances are it’s a power supply issue and you should probably check the fuse panel.  If the display is on, but no sound is coming out, then things start to get a little tricky. You could have a completely shorted out speaker and the system is in a protection mode to keep the amp that drives the speakers from incurring damage. The amp in the system itself could be bad. (external for premium system and internal for standard equipment.) It could also be the stereo itself, but we’ll check the speakers first to verify. Testing a speaker is as easy as grabbing an ohm meter, or a digital multimeter or DMM. With the meter set to OHMS (that’s the little omega symbol or horse shoe shape icon) you will measure the resistance of the speaker across the voice coil. The voice coil is the heart of a speaker, and is essentially a thin tube with very small wire wrapped around it like a coil. When the voltage from the stereo is sent down the speaker wire, this voltage passing through this coil creates a magnetic field which reacts to the stationary magnet on the back of the speaker basket. The oscillation of this signal through the magnetic field forces the coil back and forth, and with the cone of the speaker attached to one end, the result is motive force turned into audible sound waves. Almost every automotive speaker should have a nominal resistance of 4 ohms. If you see more than a half ohm one way or the other on a calibrated meter then you know the speaker is bad or at least going bad.  To determine if your meter is calibrated to a zero ohm resistance, touch the two probes together and your meter should read 0.0, if it doesn’t then the number displayed is your resistance offset and you’ll need to do some math. The closer to zero a speaker measures, the closer to a dead short that is. And you don’t need electrical certifications to know that a short in a stereo system is a bad thing that you don’t want. Speaker resistance can be measured from the back of the stereo at the plug with it disconnected from the stereo. Or they can be measured from the back of the speaker itself. Pulling the door panel and inspecting the speaker is a good way to tell what condition the system as a whole is. If you have an older Jeep that still has the original system, then chances are those speakers are shot. A speaker doesn’t have to have a blown voice coil to be bad either. The surround the part that attaches the cone of the speaker to it’s frame or basket or the cone itself can deteriorate causing a severe lack in sound quality and output. This happens from excessive exposure to moisture and UV damage from the sun or exposure to petroleum based chemicals. Too much sun can even make plastic cone speakers brittle over time, and their cones can crack from merely closing the door too hard. So even if the Jeep has aftermarket speakers, they could be due for a refreshing.  A trained ear can oftentimes pick up the slightest issue in a system, so don’t be afraid to get the opinion of a tech from the stereo shop. These guys go through extensive training and have the ears to pick up on things that you may be used to or just taken for granted as a part of owning a noisy Jeep. And this is where I say the old Russian proverb comes into play – TRUST BUT VERIFY – You don’t have to take the stereo techs advice as gospel, so have a buddy with more tools than you help you out with some testing and inspecting. You may find that you were being sold, or you may find the tech was right and you have some audio repairs ahead of you. This can be as simple as reconnecting a loose wire, repairing a broken wire, or simply remounting a speaker that came loose. Of course you could be in a situation where replacing the speakers is necessary because of physical damage to the cone or voice coil. Or from electrical damage from excessive volume or too much wattage from a poorly tuned amp or system. Honestly there are a hundred reasons why your speaker just started making noise, and I could spend two episodes just talking about it. But if you are in the market for a new set of speakers, know that there are great sources online to find what speaker size is in what location for what vehicle. They are standardized, so don’t worry that you’ll be forced to buy a specialty Jeep speaker of some kind. As to WHAT you should buy, well that’s a topic for another episode.

Newbie Nuggets:

Inspecting your jeep AFTER a run

After a great day of wheeling it’s always a good idea to take a few minutes to look around and under your Jeep.  You just put it through some rough roads, maybe some 4 wheel drive, maybe even some extreme rock crawling. Double check things to make sure your jeep is in good working order before you hit the road back home. Here are some things to look for. Once off the trial and while airing up, take a look at your tires. Are there chunks missing from the tread or sidewalls? Is there a tree branch stuck in one of your tires that are just barely leaking but you may not want to drive home on it? It’s good to do a once over visibly to make sure there are no issues. Once you are aired up, do a quick check of some basic things to make sure you didn’t bang it too hard while on the trial and something isn’t broken or bent. 1)  Check the shocks – Check to see if they got bent while you were dancing through that rock garden. Are they leaking fluid? Do the bolts at both top and bottom seem to be tight? 2)  Check for any oil or fluid leaks. This is somewhat important. You need oil to keep things like engines and transmissions functioning. You may have kicked something up on the road. Maybe while crawling over a rock you may have peeled your diff cover off. Maybe a well-placed rock poked a hole in your gas tank and you have a slow leak. 3)  Check that your mirrors are back to normal. You may have adjusted them to back out of that obstacle you decided not to take, or you may have pulled them in to get through that tight squeeze. Once at home it’s a good idea to do a more thorough inspection. Depending on what type of terrain you put your Jeep through determines how much inspecting may be necessary. Bill uses a power washer and always does a complete inspection of our jeep top to bottom. Mostly bottom. Although it’s always nice to have a clean and shiny Jeep to drive around town or back and forth to work, it a really good idea to “detail” the bottom side as well. Bill has found things that way and avoided several larger issues, or worse, trail break-downs. He calls himself a little OCD but as he cleans the suspension, hose, brake lines, springs, shocks, drive shafts, etc. he says it’s a great way to find fatigue, stress cracks, and loose or missing bolts. And just for those owners of 2007 to 2011 JKUs that decided to rock crawl, he once found a cracked evap canister and now the “Gascap” alert appears in the display. Yes, he has one ordered – Should be here today. So make sure you create a consistent habit in your inspections and who knows what you may find. Some things to check for; 1)  Check the undercarriage, especially if you don’t have body armor. Check for upper and lower control arm rubber bushings. They tend to get destroyed when you flex the suspension a lot. 2)  Check the oil pan/gas tank 3)  Check for loose connections with wires. Or maybe they are wearing on the frame or springs. A fist full of zip ties goes a long way toward preventing failures on the road or trail. 4)  Check for loose connections with bolts. You don’t need to do a re-torque after every run but just do a visual. Sometimes it’s just enough to catch something that could become a real problem. The old saying “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” really hits home when you’re the one not breaking down on the trail and you get to help your buddy with his breakdown. Just don’t start in with “You know, if you’d just do a little preventive maintenance you wouldn’t have had this problem.” You may find yourself looking for a new trail buddy. Josh, Tammy & Tony, what type of after trail inspection do you do on your jeep?

Interview with:

Dave Gutwillig – owner/fabricator – Brave Motorsports

Dave has been involved in the automotive industry for 16 years, working in a variety of different areas to develop his skill sets.  While working at Skip Barber Racing School, he learned the fundamentals of chassis repair, race prep, and race vehicle maintenance.  To enhance his understanding of drive line mechanics, he worked at Longview Driveshaft & 4×4 for several years.  Dave was able to strengthen his fabrication skills as well as build his reputation while working at Javier’s Gulf coast crawl shop, a leading offroad shop in Houston. Dave began racing offroad in 2010 and went on to win the first race that he ever competed in, M.O.R.O.C. at Brazos Valley Offroad Ranch.  He has finished in the top 5 twice at the King of the Canyons Endurance race at canyons offroad park in Fredericksburg, TX.  Dave raced the King of the Hammers in 2011, finishing 37th out of 100 racers, of which only 47 vehicles finished the race.  He has raced the Baja Racing of Texas Texana 250 multiple times and was an extra driver for our friends at Krawltex in the chupacabra 300, also in Texana.  Dave and his team came in second place in his class at the texas desert racing “twin 150s”, a 300 mile race in the west Texas desert.  From 101 classes and rock crawling with friends, rock races and obstacle courses, weekends of driving down a 130 mile long 4wd-only beach, to powering through the desert in the hardest offroad race in the USA, Dave has done it.  with this experience and the prep that comes with it, he has gained the first hand knowledge it takes to build and maintain the proper offroad vehicle for any activity. https://bravemotorsports.com/

Campfire Side Chat:

Chris, Greg, Travis, Josh, Tammy, and Tony, meet around the campfire to talk about…  Would you be willing to sacrifice modding your Jeep to have a tow rig and trailer?”  You can join us around the campfire each Thursday night.  Follow us on Facebook to find out how you can join via Zoom conference call!

Wheeling Where:

PA Jeeps Inc. – “All Breeds Jeep Show” 

Although CoViD 19 has cancelled the 25th annual All Breeds Jeep Show, PA Jeeps, Inc. wants to still extend our Show Membership Special (18 months of membership for $50.00), to those who had planned on attending the show this year.  PA Jeeps, Inc. has offered this Membership Special for many years and the club felt we should still offer the Membership Special to those Jeep owners that are interested in joining a Jeep club.  The Show Membership Special is for New Members only. The Show Membership Special will only be available on the weekend our show was scheduled.  So, if you would like to become a member of PA Jeeps, Inc., just sign up on the weekend of July 18-19, 2020.  The Special will start at 8:00 am Saturday July 18, 2020 and run through 6:00 pm Sunday July 19, 2020.  At that time, you will receive a membership that is valid until 12/31/2021.  That’s 18 months of fun and frivolity.  Hope you sign up !!! http://pajeeps.org/index.php/membership/

Links Mentioned in this Episode: 

https://www.bravemotorsports.com/
https://www.facebook.com/BraveMotorsports/
https://www.instagram.com/bravemotorsports/
http://pajeeps.org/index.php/membership/

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Episode 442 – Sean Holman of The Truck Show Podcast


This Week In Jeep: 

Jeep Recall Alert!

There’s nothing quite like the feeling trying to scale a difficult obstacle off-road and succeeding on the first try. And nothing can take that feeling away faster than the engine dying on you halfway through your pull.  Jeepers of yesteryear were plagued frequently by this during the YJ era when JEep was using that pesky Carter brand carburetor on the engines at the time.  Nowadays, losing fuel pressure in the carburetor because you got too off camber is a thing of the past and nary a Jeeper has to worry about such things anymore. That is unless you own a newer model Jeep Cherokee that is. I’m not sure if JEep has a model which has had more recalls than the Cherokee. I’ll have to look that up one of these days, but this newest recall is affecting anywhere between 65k and 95k vehicles depending on who you ask.  If you own a 2014 to 2017 Jeep Cherokee and its not a full on soccer mom grocery getter, then chances are you’re affected. To know if your Jeep is affected, it needs to be a 2014 to 2017 model year, and have a low-range capable transfer case.  I’m sorry I’m using that term loosely here. These vehicles don’t actually have a transfer case.  They instead have what is called a two-speed Power Transfer Unit, which only simulates the sort of two-speed transfer case found in most part-time four-wheel-drive trucks and SUVs which are designed to handle actual off-road use. Jeep brands these systems affected by the recall as “Active Drive II” or “Active Drive Lock.” The former was optional on multiple trims; the latter was standard on all Trailhawk models. It is this sort of lack of a real 4WD system that is the reason behind why we pick on these lesser Jeeps so much. And it is recalls and issues like this that keep popping up that may have many of you wishing you would have sprung for a real Jeep, but i digress. So how serious of an issue is this really, and exactly what is happening? I’m glad you asked. In a recent press release FCA stated that they discovered that a critical driveline connection may, in certain circumstances, slip. Should this occur, it may lead to loss of propulsion while driving, which would obviously suck, especially if you were trying to use a newer model cherokee offroad. This issue can also prevent the transmission from completely engaging into PARK when the vehicle is stationary as well, causing a roll away condition. You may remember something similar happening with the Grand Cherokees back in the middle of 2016 when actor Anton Yelchin was killed when his own Jeep slipped out of park and smashed him against the gate of his driveway. That however was attributed to a problematic gearshift design, which was linked to more than 266 rollaway crashes and 68 injuries, in 2012-14 Dodge Charger and Chrysler 300s and 2014-15 Jeep Grand Cherokees. FCA says one accident has been attributed to this issue, but no injuries were associated. Notices will begin going out to owners of the recalled models next month. In the meantime, if you think you’re affected by this, then you can wait for your notice, call  your local dealer, or look up your vehicle information on the NHTSA website to find out what to do next. The fix for this will involve you taking the Jeep to your local dealer  where the service department will install an updated software patch that will alert the driver to the malfunction when it occurs. If the vehicle is in motion, the computer will automatically shunt power to the rear wheels to maintain propulsion. If a malfunction is detected while attempting to shift into park, the system will also apply the parking brake automatically to prevent roll-away. Something you should be doing anyways, but I guess FCA knows best, and we apparently need even more driver assistant technology shoved down our throats because we are obviously too effing stupid to knwo how to park our own vehicles safely. 

Jeep vs. Mahindra – Winning Verdict!

The battle between Jeep and Mahindra is now several years old. For those who don’t know the name Roxor, it is a little vehicle made by an Indian company who has been authorised to manufacture parts for Jeep and even vehicles resembling Jeeps for decades.The company started selling the vehicles in the U.S. in 2018, prompting Jeep parent Fiat Chrysler Automobiles to take legal action. The Roxor isn’t even a federally approved automobile, but classified as a side-by-side UTV. The bare-bones not-street-legal vehicle is similar in design to the Willys MB, which Mahindra had previously been allowed to build for sale in Asia under license from Jeep. Last week, the International Trade Commission ruled that Mahindra violated the “trade dress” of Jeep’s vehicles, and ordered it to stop selling the Roxor in the U.S. Earlier this year, Mahindra attempted to address the issue by replacing the vertical slats of the front grille with an oval grille which looked almost exactly like the front end of an FJ Cruiser, but the ITC ruling was actually based on six other parts, not just the grille. FCA issued a statement this week saying it was pleased with the decision, while Mahindra is predictably considering an appeal.

A convoy for a cause, Jeep journey in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania to help local cancer patients

A  fairly new organization known as “Blacktop Warriors Jeep Club” is rallying jeep lovers around Pennsylvania to cruise for a cause. And it’s a good cause too! The event helps cancer patients, and any Jeep event or club that is helping beat cancer or live better with it… gets as much attention as I can point their way. Cancer takes so much from those who it inflicts, and the families around them. So the rally happening this weekend is a great way to get out with the Jeep, take your top off, get some fresh air and enjoy life to the fullest! Blacktop Warriors Jeep Club is hosting a convoy for a cause this Saturday, June 20, in Luzerne County. The event benefits the cancer resource and wellness center “Candy’s Place” in Forty Fort Pennsylvania. The convoy takes jeep owners on a one hour drive and ends at Grotto Pizza in Harveys Lake. For more information on this event, links and how to support the cause, check out the show notes for this episode on our website.

Tech Talk With Jeep Talk: 

Sticky or Hard To Shift Manual Trans Fix

Allison M. wrote into the show recently asking a couple technical questions. The first referred to a screenshot from his OBDII code reader, which was running some real time diagnostics at the time. For those who have a bluetooth dongle and something like the Torque App, or have spent more than $40 on a code reader, chances are that it too has the ability to display real time vehicle information. Things like throttle position, air or oil temperatures, voltage and even things like speed, rpm, and other system stats. Allison was asking about a couple of numbers that were displayed and wasn’t sure what they meant or if they were in normal operating parameters or not. For that part i’m going to answer him personally, as the answer isn’t going to mean anything to anyone without that screengrab and the exact same vehicle. Not to mention it’s pretty dry and boring stuff. The other question he had was transmission related, which is always fun…. and he asks the show: “Hey Jeep Talk Show! My Jeep is a 97 TJ with a 4.0 manual transmission and a rear lunchbox locker running 31” tires. My tranny is sticking and is kind of rough going in and out of first gear and sometimes second too. How difficult is it to rebuild a manual transmission and would that fix my issue?” As always, I like to start off with saying thanks for writing into the show. I think in Allison’s case, it’s likely not the transmission itself, but is likely a support system designed to help the transmission operate easier. What I think is happening is that Allison is having an issue with either the master cylinder or the slave cylinder of his transmission, possibly both. A clutch master cylinder is a component found on vehicles equipped with manual transmission, and serves as the pump for the hydraulically operated clutch system. The slave cylinder on a manual transmission works in conjunction with the clutch master cylinder to disengage the clutch when the pedal is pressed so that the transmission can be safely shifted. Since these systems are hydraulic in nature, clutch master cylinders are often prone to issues with leaks that will interfere with its ability to displace fluid. Let’s quickly look at the symptoms of a failing clutch master or slave cylinder, as you may have an issue yourself , and not even know it. One of the first symptoms commonly associated with a potential problem with the clutch master cylinder is low or dirty fluid in the reservoir. If it’s dark, and you’re having to top it off frequently, then you likely have a leak in the system and it’s only a matter of time before things get worse. Another symptom commonly associated with a bad or failing clutch master cylinder is difficulty shifting. If the master cylinder is not able to properly create pressure, it will not be able to disengage the clutch properly when the pedal is pressed. This may lead to grinding the gears when shifting, and possibly even a transmission that pops out of gear. Abnormal pedal pressure is another symptom of a potential problem with a bad or failing master cylinder. If the cylinder develops any internal issues, it will directly affect the feel of the pedal. A leaky cylinder may cause the pedal to feel mushy or spongy, and in more severe cases, will lead to a pedal that will sink to the floor and stay there when depressed. Luckily for Allison, fixing this doesn’t require rebuilding the entire transmission or even replacing the clutch. For the TJ’s the clutch master and slave cylinders come as a complete kit, which typically costs anywhere from $80 to $180 and can be installed with regular hand tools in a couple of hours or less. Chilton or Haynes manuals have the process and there are also some great videos and write-ups online that can give you a step by step guide on how to do this procedure yourself. I will make one note on this job though. This is another one of those “you get what you pay for” moments. From my experience, the cheaper replacement kits not only are a little tight on the hose lengths, but they also sometimes put the Neutral Safety Switch in a slightly different position than the OEM units, which may give you problems when trying to start the Jeep after the repair. This in no way affects the function of the transmission or how the clutch operates, just the switch that tells the Jeep it’s in neutral, or that the clutch is in and the engine is safe to start. With the lesser quality replacement kits, the Jeep may not realize it’s actually in neutral since the switch isn’t picking up the throw of the clutch pedal in the same way as before. Allegedly the OEM and more expensive kits do not have this issue, but this doesn’t mean the cheaper ones won’t work. You may just end up having to uninstall it and make some modifications which typically involve shimming the master cylinder with O-rings which moves the switches position to the correct spot. There are also ways to bypass the neutral safety switch completely, but you didn’t hear that from me. Alison could have other issues, transmissions are fickle things and usually you want to leave the repair or rebuilding of these systems to the professionals, as oftentimes there are specialty tools required for installation or set up that you may not have. But I think the clutch master cylinder is a good place to start, and for less than $200 in parts and materials and a few hours of wrenching, i’d say it’s worth it.

Newbie Nuggets: 

With lots of resources out there for newbies, how do you decide on where or  whom you get your information from. Since there are hundreds of options including websites, YouTube with lots of information (good and bad), Facebook groups, Instagram, Podcasts and, of course, the person who thinks he knows it all because that’s where he went or what he bought. So how do you choose? You have already made a great choice by listening to The Jeep Talk Show, the most downloaded Jeep podcast.  Another valuable resource I discovered are the Jeep Wrangler YJ and JK Performance How–To books, written by Don Alexander and Quinn Thomas (owner, All J Products in Big Bear Calif). For those of you familiar with Don Alexander, he is a friend of the Jeep Talk Show and has been interviewed on a previous episode. Don has over 50 years’ experience driving race cars, setting multiple land speed records at Bonneville, test driver and racer. These days Don teaches people who want to improve their off-road skills driving their jeeps at his Jeep 4×4 School in So. California. His expertise in writing books and magazine articles, like Motor Trend & Hot Rod, and testing for several suspension and tire companies qualifies him as an expert in many areas including jeeps. When he was asked to write a book about the YJ and the JK he was up for the task.  Both books are filled with everything you need to know to upgrade & modify your jeep. Great books for newbies, who may be looking to do some modifications or just want to know how things work. I like the pictures and details presented in the books, it helps my brain “visualize” the descriptions. This book helps me break down and simplify different modifications and upgrades. The books highlight in detail info on wheels/tires, suspensions and lifts, brakes, bumpers and armor protection. It also includes info on drive-lines, axles and lockers, engines, engine swaps and transmissions. The sections on winches, vehicle recovery, gear and trail tools are perfect for getting prepared to head out on the trail. The back of the book lists all the sources they used for the testing and info throughout the book. The books are a relatively inexpensive (around $23-$28 on Amazon) resource guide that may give you additional information OR create a monster because now you’ve learned about an upgrade for your jeep that you just can’t live without. Uh-Huh. Either way, you will find great information in these books.  Resources, like these books, are a great way to learn what modifications are possible and keep you informed. Don is working on a new book for the JL and the JT Gladiator and should be out in about 16 months. So whether you plan to upgrade your jeep from the ground up or just want a guide to improve certain things, the Jeep Wrangler YJ & JK books are a must for anyone’s library. Links for these books are in the show notes.  https://www.amazon.com/dp/1613253591/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_al86EbPTKCDKA  https://www.amazon.com/dp/1613254482/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_Ym86EbSGY1TH4  Josh, Tony, do you have any resources you love and recommend for newbies? Same book series from SA designs by Eric Zappe for the XJ Cherokee: Jeep Cherokee Performance Upgrades: 1984–2001 (Performance How-to) By Eric Zappe https://amzn.to/3eigKNV Jeep Cherokee XJ 1984-2001: Advanced Performance Modifications (Performance How-to) https://amzn.to/30X9Nhm  ANY Chilton or Haynes manual for torque specs, recommended fluids, capacities, service intervals, etc. And of course, the world’s largest glossary of Jeep and off road related terminology… The Jeep Talk Show Glossary of Terms – only avail on our website.

Interview with: 

Sean P. Holman
Truck expert and longtime automotive journalist Sean P. Holman (Truck Trend, Four Wheeler, Diesel Power, Truckin, Jp, and Petersen’s 4-Wheel & Off-Road), the Truck Show Podcast brings a unique and entertaining perspective to all things truck, including those lifted, lowered, and everything in between.

Must Have Stuff:

Fabtech FTS24194 Interior Cargo Rack for:

07-18 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited JK 4 Door ($299 w/ free shipping) Suddenly having more storage inside the secured cargo area is on the top of every Jeep Wrangler owner’s list. This week I’m highlighting a solution that not only solves this, but gives you some serious bragging rights too, as this thing looks really cool. The Interior Cargo Rack from Fabtech uses a double-deck design that is located in the cargo area behind the rear seat. This design adds a massive 4.5 square feet of additional storage capacity to the interior of your Jeep. A heavy-duty powder coated steel construction that installs in just three pieces supporting up to 150 lbs of gear with integrated tie-down points for safety. In other words, they’ve covered all the bases, and ensured this thing will add to the appearance of your Jeep, not take away from it. Full steel construction, installation requires no drilling! Limited Lifetime Warranty. The link we’ll have in the show notes for this episode will get you one for your 07-18 JKU Wrangler, but they are available for other model Jeeps as well. Cost is normally over $350! But the link in our show notes will get you one of these for under $300 and will include free shipping too!

https://www.quadratec.com/p/fabtech/interior-cargo-rack-jeep-wrangler-unlimited-jk-4-door

Campfire Side Chat:

“What weird, crazy or outlandish idea have you come up with or actually done to get more money to spend on your Jeep?”

Wheeling Where:

Convoy For a Cause
Saturday, June 20, at 10:30 a.m.
Meetup is at Candy’s Place, 190 Welles Street, Forty Fort
$30.00 per jeep
While admission to the event is free, only jeeps are allowed to cruise in the convoy.
Blacktop Warriors Jeep Club https://www.facebook.com/EatSleepJeepRepeat/
Can’t make the event, but still want to help?
Donate to Candy’s Place here https://cancerwellnessnepa.org/donate/

Links Mentioned in this Episode: 

https://www.youtube.com/user/backcountrydriver
https://truckshowpodcast.libsyn.com/
https://www.instagram.com/truckshowpodcast/
https://www.facebook.com/truckshowpodcast/
https://www.quadratec.com/p/fabtech/interior-cargo-rack-jeep-wrangler-unlimited-jk-4-door

 

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Episode 441 – Life is Like a Box of Jeeps

This Week In Jeep: 

Police Slow Speed Pursuit of Jeep Wrangler

This is just insulting!  You may have missed this, but three days ago police were shown in a low speed chase on I-95 in Florida.  The chase, sometimes reaching speeds of posted speed limits, began in Oakland Park and headed northbound from there. Police in a bit of irony removed the Freedom top of the late model Jeep Wrangler to arrest the male driver.  The driver is being charged with aggravated battery, fleeing and eluding.  Personally I think eluding would be a hard charge to prove in court. 			</div><!-- .entry-content -->
	
	
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