Episode 459 – Trail Braking, Wire Loom and Free Stuff!

This episode brought to you in part by, ExtremeTerrainBe sure to check out the latest episode of ExtremeTerrain’s Throttle Out YouTube Series where host Merideth Evasew selects her top 5 Wrangler mods you should consider for your JK.  Since the JL and Gladiator are currently taking a lot of the spotlight, this video will appeal to owners of the longest-running Wrangler generation since the CJ.

This Week In Jeep: 

Close Call For This Jeeper’s Passenger in Colorado

I think Tammy has been where this Jeep once was, and if I remember correctly, I scoffed at her response to the trails up there.  Now I take it all back. And here’s why… They say things happen in threes. Jeeps apparently are no exception.  First it was that jeep on a bike trail in California that damn near had to be rescued by helicopter.  Then it was the snowflake spotted Jeep on a hiking trail, and now we have this. This week, pictures have been coming out showing – what is left of – a red Jeep Wrangler who had a passenger and two dogs in it while it was parked on one of those steep and rather narrow Black Bear Pass Trails as it winds up through Bridal Veil Falls. The driver was outside of the Jeep helping another vehicle, when all the sudden, the edge of the trail gave way and the Jeep started sliding.  It only took a second before the Jeep was in full tumble. The passenger, 23 year old Suzie Rhodes was ejected from the vehicle, as were both dogs. The Jeep rolled too many times to count, and crossed over several switchbacks, falling hundreds of feet in elevation down the mountainside. The Jeep is literally unrecognizable. Suzie Rhodes had to be airlifted from the mountain and sustained a laundry list of severe injuries. She was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital in Grand Junction, where she underwent an intense surgery on her spinal cord. Thankfully to the skilled team of surgeons there, she is in stable condition. One of the dogs was missing for a couple days, but has since been recovered. Neither animal suffered any serious injuries. Black Bear Pass outside Telluride Colorado is no joke. I made fun of Tammy as she recounted her experience up there, chocking it up to her fear of heights more than anything. This is not the kind of terrain that you take lightly, as clearly it doesn’t take any action from you or other motorists whatsoever for things to go completely sideways on you in a heartbeat. Accidents happen offroad all the time, and when they do, in places like this, they aren’t exactly fender-benders. So please, this winter. Take it easy out there and above all else, be aware of your surroundings no matter where you wheel. Look for how the runoff has eroded the trail, look for fractures in the hill side, and keep an eye out for possible rock slides, or leaning trees that are at odds with gravity more than they should be.  It doesn’t take but a second for you to miss something out on the trails that could very well change your life forever. So be safe, have fun, and stay vigilant.  

New Towing Accessory For Jeep Gladiator

If you’re like me, then there’s a good chance you have your eye on the Gladiator.  Jeep’s mid-size pickup that is just utterly blowing the competition away. I love the possibilities a Gladiator affords. That is if you can afford one to begin with. From a capable trail rig, to an amazing overlanding platform, the Gladiator seems to have it all. And when it comes to towing, Jeeps pickup truck can get the job done. And one of the jobs the Gladiator was marketed as doing well was the job of towing. In fact one of the first in-print pics of the Gladiator was showing it towing a flatbed trailer with an old school full size Wagoneer on it. That immediately had most of us daydreaming of towing our Jeeps with another Jeep. Super cool right? But the questions immediately surfaced… is it really that capable, and is it safe considering its still just a midsize truck. Well, if towing is your concern, Mopar has you covered with a new factory accessory trailer brake controller. While a midsize pickup might not be the ideal towing rig for every application, a factory-backed brake controller provides peace of mind to those who use their trucks… as trucks with any sort of regularity. And for just $299, it’s relatively inexpensive peace of mind. The new trailer brake controller is easily integrated into the Jeep Gladiator’s instrument panel. Installed in a blank panel in the dash, in front of the transmission shift lever, the round controller knob provides a consistent look and feel with the vehicle’s interior. In other words, it looks more like it belongs and less like it was an afterthought. And in the event you are lucky enough to own a Gladiator already, YES…this new controller CAN also be retrofitted into Jeep Gladiators that are already on the road. To get yours contact your local dealer today.

Newbie Nuggets:

Obstacle got you thinking?

Have you ever approached an obstacle and found yourself trying to make the decision to go around or OVER? (if around was even an option). If you are new to Jeeping, I’m sure you’ve asked yourself these questions? Is my Jeep set up enough? Will there be body damage and how much? Do I need skid plates? Will I tip over?! Along with these questions, there may be others like: If they did it, can I do it? Or  Do I have the skills yet? All good questions and as a newer driver, wise questions. But honestly what is the deciding factor of when to tackle an obstacle? When you are new to driving and you are out wheeling (hopefully with others) and you come across an obstacle that looks like a challenge? What do YOU do? I think the best answer is to get out and take a look at the obstacle. Look at where you want your tires to go. Look where you DON’T want your tires to go. Then look at your line and see what and how you need to get over it. I would also look at the line from the jeeps perspective and also from farther down the trail looking back at the jeep’s line. This gives you two perspectives. Maybe watch someone else go over it and hopefully they have a similar jeep in body style, length and set-up. Watch what they did or didn’t do right and determine how you would approach it and why. As long as you have some modifications to protect your jeep, there really isn’t much that can go wrong – well sort of. If you keep your skinny pedal lightly covered and your left foot on the brake, and you watch your spotter then mostly it will be a piece of cake. Remember, sometimes a little bit of tire spin is ok and sometimes necessary. But, a lot of wheel spin is a good way to break axles or drive shafts when that spinning tire finally hooks up. SNAP! Keep in mind that even stock jeeps are set up to go boldly through the trails, however, it’s our skinny pedal, ego and pocketbooks that may not be set up. I always say that no matter the obstacle if you don’t feel confident yet to tackle it, DON’T. There is no shame in a bypass or turning around. The accomplishment of getting over an obstacle can be very rewarding and increase your confidence on tackling other more difficult trails. We are fortunate here in So. Cal has so many types of trails that we can start out on very easy trails and move up to medium and eventually black diamond all relatively close to each other.  Here’s a quick list of things to consider before tackling that obstacle: What type of Jeep do you have and how is it set up? How long or short is it?Have others with the same size Jeep been over it? Do you have lockers – do you need them? Do you know how to use them? Do you have body armor (underneath and rock sliders)? Is this the first time you have driven OVER an obstacle? What type of obstacle is it? Water, vs rocks, vs ruts, vs mud? Have you aired down enough to get your sidewalls flexing? Do you know how far your Jeep can lean to the side before it tips over? Can you operate the gas and the brake at the same time? When the day comes to try something bigger, or different, don’t be afraid. You just never know the possibilities and things you can do unless you take that first step (I mean obstacle).

Tech Talk With Jeep Talk: 

Anytime you add some wiring to a vehicle, it’s a good idea to protect said wiring from, well, pretty much everything. The protection helps keep the new wiring clean and safe, but ultimately, it makes things just look cleaner, and helps make that new wire run look more like a factory loom, then a hack job. Wire loom, or corrugated split loom comes in fractional sizes in ¼” increments. Starting at ¼” diameter, perfect for a single 10 gauge wire run or a bundle of about 6 primary or 16 gauge wires. From there we go up and I’ve seen split loom as large as 3.5” in diameter …but that stuff looks weird in a vehicle, and chance are, you’re not doing a wiring job that big on any vehicle, and even if you were… it would be better to break up that loom into smaller ones to help better identify circuits. There are all kinds of wire loom out there. Some look like the end of a spiral notebook, and then there’s the stuff that resembles an old phone cord. There’s even a mesh in tube form that they sell as wire loom. ALL of those are hard to work with, and don’t offer the protection, aesthetics or ease of use that corrugated split loom does. Split loom is very easy to work with, even when it’s cold, and it’s cheap too! Usually costing less than 50 cents a foot, whole rolls can be purchased on amazon for next to nothing, so it’s affordable and easy to keep a couple sizes around for various projects. Add a little heat shrink to the ends for a real OEM/factory look, and you’ll be dressing things up in no time. So remember, the next time you add in something like an amp, an alarm, some auxiliary lighting or anything where you are running an exposed wire, consider wrapping it up with some split loom for a more professional finished look.

Jeep Life:

Hey everyone! So Answering Wendy’s question from last week… Sadly, I have not been ducked. However, years ago probably 10 years ago, we had a duck addiction at my house. There was “good behavior” program at my son’s elementary school. Good students would get ducks. My kids were so obsessed with them, they wanted to collect them. They found out you could buy these ducks on Oriental Trading. We probably had over 200 ducks. I don’t think we have that many anymore. They just saved their special ones. I ended up selling them on Ebay.  Josh You were so correct about learning so much from Junkyard lifts. This past year that’s what I have been doing… learning so much about Junkyard builds and lifts. Tony mentioned bastard packs. I can tell you I know what those are and have seen them in action. We did that to our YJ. We took the top 2 leaf springs from an S-10 Blazer cut the eyes off and installed them in the YJ. They added 1 and a half inches of lift and stiffened the springs to work with the SOA Spring Over Axle. Junkyard builds have helped me understand more of how the Jeeps work. I am really enjoying it. We are working on another YJ now.  Now a big shout out to Chris one of the Zoomers in the Zoom Room. He shared with me how he liked my Top 5.  That has rejuvenated my YouTube Video Ideas. You would be surprised how many people like those videos as well as my How To’s. There are a lot of folks out there thanking me for my How To use those Ten Thousand dollar buttons in my Rubicon – you know the ones – the sway lock and axle lock. A lot of folks had no idea how to use them.  It’s a good reminder that a lot of people buying Jeeps are like I once was. I knew absolutely nothing about Jeeps, or off roading, or anything mechanical in a vehicle when I first bought my Jeep. Go check out my YouTube video for more Top 5’s and How To’s. You can also download previous episodes of the Jeep Talk Show for them as well. On You Tube just search Jeep Momma. Okay Back to this week’s Top 5. My Top 5 Recovery Items I have actually used the most on the trail. These will be in order. The use of these items is not just getting my vehicle out of a situation but me helping other vehicles or even to loan out the items to others getting their vehicles out of sticky situations. It’s what you do out on the trails. It’s like everything in your Jeep or off-road vehicle is considered community property. For the most part I have found Jeepers and off roaders are very generous people.  Let’s start with Number 5. My Tree Saver  The first time I used it, I was so excited because I was able to loan it out to other Jeepers in need of the tree saver. We used it several times on the Rubicon Trail. Another time it was used by our Jeep group on a Virginia trail. We came across a lone Jeeper stuck in a big mud puddle… I mean HUGE mud pit. We had to use the tree saver, winch and snatch block. Number 4 Rachet straps These have come in so handy when parts start coming off your Jeep while your wheeling hard in the rocks. Number 3 My Winch Yes Tony a winch is necessary. I have used my winch several times to help others out of sticky situations or through and obstacle. I have used my winch once to get myself up an obstacle. Number 2 Recovery Strap Before my winch I used my recovery strap so many times for myself and other Jeeps. And the Number 1 item is my soft shackle. I love my soft shackle. Instead of trying to loosen up those super tight d-rings because you have tightened them so much because you don’t want to lose them from rattling off. I have loaned mine out to other Jeepers several times and every time I do a recovery, I have used mine.  So here are a couple of Recovery Items that I carry I haven’t used… YET…. My gloves and a shovel Next week on Jeep Life The Top 5 Mods I would do before I lifted my Jeep.

Interview with:

Brian Goldwitz with EZTrunk

Brian at EZTRUNK® loved the lifestyle and freedom of his Jeep®, but is there freedom? When he went to Home Depot, the grocery store, a hike, kayaking, or stopping for a quick bite to eat, he found that he was tied to his backpack filled with documents, computers, cash, and credit cards. Where could he put his stuff when he wanted freedom from his property? That’s when he had his aha moment. Build a trunk, not a box that takes up all the space in your rear cargo area – a folding trunk. For almost two years after that aha moment, he worked on building and perfecting a folding Jeep trunk. 2020 proved to be the beginning of a new adventure. With the EZTRUNK developed and a newly approved patent in hand, they are ready to unveil a product that truly gives you freedom, convenience, and security – EZTRUNK. January 2019 Wrangler Sales Set a Third Straight Monthly Record Another month, another record for Jeep Wrangler Sales! The 13,024 Wranglers sold last month represents the most Wranglers ever sold in the month of January, and it also marks the third straight month in which a monthly Wrangler sales record was set. FCA US Reports 2019 January Sales WITH 2019 RECORD JEEP SALES what better time to bring this patented folding trunk to a market that needs a product that is a convenient and secure way to protect belongings while enjoying the Jeep experience of going topless. EZTRUNK is a safe, secure place to lock up valuables with your top up or down.

Campfire Side Chat:

Wheeling in unfamiliar terrain offers unique challenges that can’t be found elsewhere. With that said, “Do you have any interest in night wheeling? – if no -WHY?”  People around the virtual campfire, Larry H., Neil, Tammy, Travis E., Bob, Chris, Shawn S.  You can watch us on Facebook LIVE every Thursday at 10pm CT.  You can join in our virtual campfire side chat by joining our Zoom meeting.  Subscribe to our newsletter to get notifications and links to join the show.  Follow us on Facebook (Jeep Talk Show) so you’ll receive notifications when we go LIVE.

Links Mentioned in this Episode: 

https://eztrunk.net/
https://www.facebook.com/keepyourjunkinthetrunk/
http://www.newcomerracing.com/

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The post Episode 459 - Trail Braking, Wire Loom and Free Stuff! first appeared on Jeep Talk Show.

Episode 458 – A Weak Point CAN Be a Good Thing!

This Week In Jeep: 

What do you do if you want to be a Jeeper but your town is overrun with rioters?

Well let me introduce you to Jeeps very own bullet proof production vehicle. Unfortunately, it’s only available in Mexico. Well, I guess it’s time to cash in those sky miles! The bulletproof grand Cherokee just hit a milestone too, as of October 2nd, 2020, the automaker has built and sold 1,000 of them. The body armor for these Grand Cherokees includes elements like ballistic steel perimeter caps that protect the upper part of the vehicle. The vehicle’s glass is gone, instead, there are multiple layers of polyvinyl with a total thickness of 0.75 inches (19-millimeters). There are lots of other tank-like tweaks, like an anti-grenade bottom panel, fully armored engine compartment, window and frame reinforcements, a strengthened suspension, and run-flat tires. Jeep’s armored Grand Cherokee adheres to the US Department of Justice’s NIJ-IIIA level of protection.  What that means is that in order to achieve this rating, the ballistic protection of the vehicle needs to be able to withstand five consecutive rounds of .44 Magnum from at least a 5.5-inch barrel …AND five bullets from a 9-millimeter submachine gun with a barrel at least 9.5 inches long. In other words, this thing can basically withstand an armed attack from BOTH Dirty Harry AND John Wick simultaneously. The DOJ describes NIJ-IIIA as being enough to guard against most handgun threats. Jeep actually manufactures these Grand Cherokees here in the U.S. at the Jefferson North Assembly Plant in Detroit. They then go to Mexico where the SUV undergoes the armoring process. The Jeep uses a 5.7-liter V8 that makes 360 horsepower and 390 pound-feet of torque. The only transmission available for these is the eight-speed automatic and uses the Quadra-Trac II active, full-time 4WD system. I guess that means with the beefed up suspension this thing should still be pretty capable off-road. Inside, there are amenities like rich leather all around, an 8.4-inch infotainment display and two-zone automatic climate control among other creature comforts you would expect to come with the Grand Cherokee. So, if you’re like me and question the protective capabilities of your own vehicle as you drive through a city of “peaceful protestors” at night, then consider a bulletproof grand Cherokee. Prices for the armored Jeep Grand Cherokee (in Mexico) start at a little over 1,850,000 pesos (or about $86,500 at current exchange rates.) And with as much as this thing has to weigh, I can’t imagine it would be cheap to ship one back to the US either. (that’s providing customs doesn’t want to have a look at your new daily driver)

We have our first glimpse of the production version of the Jeep Grand Wagoneer

Jeep has been hard at work for some time now on these things too. Lots of work has gone into not only designing, building and now testing the new full size Jeep SUV’s, but I would say just as much work has gone into keeping things as much of a secret as possible. That is until last week when head of Jeep Jim Morrison announced that the concept photos released by Jeep in early September were not concept photos but actual representations of what we can expect to see on showroom floors next year. Since that announcement, TONS of Grand Wagoneer news has been flooding the web. Once again, I have to give credit to the spy photogs at Car and Driver. These guys always seem to get the first shots of the new Jeeps. And they’ve done it again, in spying a Grand Wagoneer in paisley paint getting a run through on city streets. So is what Jim Morrison said true? Well, when compared with the concept version of the full-size SUV that Jeep showed in September, the production Jeep looks nearly identical save for its smaller wheels and tires. You can’t really tell the exact size in these spy photos, it’s clear the wheels and tires on the production test vehicle are nowhere near the massive  24-inchers seen on the Grand Wagoneer concept. It’s possible Jeep will still offer some sort of huge wheel option for production, of course, but more likely that most Wagoneers will have more reasonable 20-, 21-, and 22-inch wheel options. The smaller rolling stock serves to accentuate the Wagoneer’s boxy, tall body, especially from the rear.  Some of the details are different, too, such as the grille shape and the headlights. But we were warned about the lighting elements getting a change from what we saw in the concept pics, and we can see that here with a much more realistic headlight arrangement inside what is a slightly less dramatic-looking grille. We don’t see the fanciful teak accents seen inside the concept car’s LED headlight fixtures, and the taillights are a bit more subdued as well. Jeep will offer both Wagoneer and Grand Wagoneer variants of its new full-size SUV, with the latter expected to be more luxurious in terms of trim and features. So who knows, maybe we will see those styling elements from the concept integrated in higher trim levels. Either way, both the Wagoneer and the Grand Wagoneer will ride on the Ram 1500 pickup’s body-on-frame architecture, with modifications including an independent rear suspension. The loss of the solid rear axle gives these larger SUV’s the ability to offer three rows of seats, which will be standard across the board. The concept version allegedly had a plug-in hybrid powertrain, but we expect Jeep to offer conventional V-6 and V-8 gas engines as well, likely the 3.6-liter V-6 and 5.7-liter V-8 units that are already found in the Ram. Jeep has also finally announced pricing structures for the new lines after a very long wait and much debate. We already knew that the top of the line trim is going to run over the six figure mark, but entry level trim will have buyers seeing a starting price at around $60,000. “I CALLED IT!” We should find out more about the production SUVs early next year, as they’re scheduled to start production in mid-2021 before going on sale shortly thereafter.

Newbie Nuggets:

To duck or not to duck?

I’m sure you have all seen it one time or another on FB or Instagram, pictures of people and their little tiny rubber ducks. If you were curious, like I was, I did some checking and it’s quite a popular trend among jeep owners to cheer people up. There are Facebook groups, websites  and Instagram pages filled with people that have been ducked.  Have you been ducked? The idea is that you place a rubber duck on someone’s jeep with a kind message. It’s supposed to be a gesture in kindness and happy thoughts that you can also pass along. Once you get one, you pass along the kindness to someone else and keep it going. There are websites, facebook pages and Instagram that encourage you to share a picture of your duck and thus it begins.  The ducking was created by Allison Parliament. She works in Alabama and Canada and was splitting her time between the two countries due to Covid when she was approached by a man who basically told her to get the F*** out of Canada and that she wasn’t welcome in Canada. Even though she was born and raised there. Well after that terrifying ordeal she turned to something humorous and her and her friends bought some rubber ducks and began placing them on jeeps with messages to pass along the kindness and to take pictures with their rubber ducks. Several months later there are thousands of followers and people participating in this happy trend. There is a website where you can send a duckygram (to brighten someone’s day), or purchase duck-kits (have plenty on hand to pass out to all the jeeps you see) or even a program for clubs to get involved in fundraising. OR you can just go online, buy a bunch of rubber ducks at Walmart, or Amazon, make up the kind gesture cards and start ducking jeeps. You can find ducks to match anything you want, like the color of your jeep (or the jeep you are placing the duck on), or your destination; for instance I saw a pic of a jeep that got ducked on the Beach in California and the rubber ducky was holding a surfboard. I’ve seen pictures of ducks dressed as a fireman, policeman, in motorcycle leathers and even shorts and Hawaiian shirts. I’ve seen some holding things, like a cell phone, or selfie stick, candy, baseball, basketball and even some with sunglasses. It seems you can find all kinds of ducks doing all kinds of things to fit your lifestyle. And it’s not limited to yellow rubber ducks either; they come in all colors of the rainbow. I would give a word of warning; some areas of this country may not appreciate someone ducking their jeep, so giver beware…. So whether you have been ducked or you want to start ducking jeeps, I have some links in the show notes to get you started. Or you can simply search “ducking jeeps” and see what pops up. And call into the show to let us know if you have been ducked and what type of duck you got? Links: FB: Duckduckjeep,  #duckduckjeep,  http://jeepduck.com/ 

Tech Talk With Jeep Talk: 

More Tips From The Junk Yard

Ok last week in Tech Talk we covered an inexpensive way to breathe new life into a saggy leaf sprung Jeep by using parts out of a Junkyard. Well I wanted to continue with this junkyard theme and give some love to the TJ crowd this week. TJ owners deserve a cheap solution to spring problems just as much as anyone else. And of course one of the things that eats any TJ budget to shreds is the cost of a lift kit. Well I’m going to give you a couple of suggestions for some junk yard parts that will help you lift a stock TJ to fit much bigger tires and give you more articulation. What I’m about to share with you will net you anywhere between 2 and 3 inches of lift when you’re done. To accomplish this, you will be pulling the front springs from a V8 Grand Cherokee ZJ. That’s the Jeep SUV built between 1993 and 1998. It must be a V8 Grand Cherokee too, or you won’t get the lift out of the springs. You will also need the thicker isolators found with those same springs. Remember, the Grand was a luxury Jeep, and to dampen some of the road noise they used much thicker isolators that act more like a spacer on the TJ than a sound dampener. The V8 engine in the grands was a much heavier engine and required a slightly taller spring that the V8 grands did, and these springs and isolators together are about 2 to 3 inches or so taller than the front stock TJ springs. Now to bring the rear up to height, we’re going to be looking for a Crown Victoria. That’s right, just like the old cop cars. The Crown Vic springs are also a taller spring, made to handle the weight of such a large car. Here too you’ll want to grab the isolators, and I hear some guys are running both sets of isolators to gain just that extra little bit of height. There are other considerations you will have to take care of after putting these springs into a TJ as well. First and foremost is going to be the shocks. The stock shocks won’t have the travel necessary for the new ride height and suspension travel, so new shocks will be needed. This is another area where the junkyard or even Craigslist, comes to the rescue. Look for take-off shocks from a stock Rubicon JKU. When someone upgrades their Jeep with aftermarket parts, they “take-off” the stock stuff and sell it for super cheap. The stock Rubicon JKU shocks (these are the red ones) will be the perfect upgrade, they are just barely within the specs needed to accommodate the new suspension of the TJ, and will be a suitable, easy to find and inexpensive option. You may need or want to look into track bar relocation brackets as well. These will be needed to re-center the axles under the Jeep after the junkyard lift. You will also want to look into getting an alignment done as soon as possible since you just changed a lot of geometry under the Jeep in some critical areas. There are also a lot of “while you’re in there’s” that can go along with this too. Things like brake line length, visual inspections of steering and brake components. Maybe it’s time for some new wheel bearings or a brake job, or maybe you’ll discover a worn tie rod end, who knows, just be prepared for the unexpected and a last minute run to the parts store. Regardless, be sure to use Black Magic Brake Pads when you DO get to the brake job, as it will help in stopping things on and off the trail. In the end, you’ll have enough lift for some larger tires, you will have increased your suspension travel, and changed the looks of your Jeep for the better.  I will warn you though, that you will get what you pay for. Things may not fit perfectly, things may squeak, and you will definitely notice a change in the ride quality. This is not going to be as soft of a ride as you had before and for a daily driver, I would almost advise against this procedure just because of that. But don’t let that stop you, once lifted, it’s a lot easier to change things later down the road, and you’ll still be doing alot better than you were previously when you’re offroad. EP 371 – BlackMagic Brakes

Jeep Life:

Top 5 Camping Gear Items I Use The Most

Jeep Momma shares her Top 5 Camping Gear Items she uses camping all the time. First Shelter which could be a tent, hammock or the back of your vehicle. Second Cooking Grate for the Fire. Third Cast Iron Pan. Fourth LT Wright knife and kitchen knife Set and Machete. Fifth Camp Chair. Items I don’t use at all. A headlamp because our phones have a flashlight. Axe because we use the machete. Firestarters because there are natural starters in nature. Toaster tool to make toast Next Week on Jeep Life I share my Top 5 items I use for Recovery in order of most used.

Interview with:

Paul Bruno author of “The Original Jeeps”

Paul Bruno has spent twenty years researching, writing and studying early Jeep history. He has spent countless hours and treasure to tell this story to the world, first for the big screen and now twice in book form. After visiting key sites in the story, and years of research, including at the United States National Archives, he combined his knowledge of project management and history into the 2014 book, Project Management in History: The First Jeep. After additional research he completed The Original Jeeps in 2020 which further tells the story of early Jeep history and continues his journey into the depths of this important inspirational work of human ingenuity. Paul has more than 30 years of experience in the fields of project management and information technology. He holds bachelor’s degrees in management and computer software, as well as master’s degrees in business administration and history. You can find The Original Jeeps at Amazon.com and more about early Jeep history at www.originaljeeps.com.

Must Have Stuff:

Carbon Fiber (DON’T call it a “JEEP”) Ring 175.00 It’s a Carbon Fiber “Off Road Inspired Tread & Grill” Ring

The entirely carbon fiber ring features an amazing carved off road style tread pattern very reminiscent of the original BFG KM1 design, but we can’t call it that…. It also comes with a very recognizable iconic grille outline that is seamlessly integrated into the ring’s design. But don’t call it a Jeep grille! … to be honest you won’t even notice or care that it’s a FIVE slot grille and not seven, so call it a Jeep grille if you want. The black carbon fiber ring is lightweight and durable and comes in a wide selection of sizes just for you. Wear it as a wedding band or a simple everyday ring to show your love for going off road. Made in the USA-Made to Order

Campfire Side Chat:

Join the Camp Fire Side chat!  Follow us on Facebook, or receive notifications via our newsletter! It’s very easy to sign up for our newsletter.  Just go to jeeptalkshow.com/contact and you’ll find a link to click and sign up!  It’s as easy to unsubscribe as it is to subscribe!  This episode we asked, “What is the weak point of your Jeep?”  We spoke with Chip, Isaac, Tammy, Stacey, Chris, and Larry!

Facebook LIVE!

You can watch us LIVE on Facebook every Thursday evening about 10pm Central Time.

Links Mentioned in this Episode: 

https://www.titanium-buzz.com/off-road-inspired-tread-grill-carbon-fiber-ring/
https://www.youtube.com/user/backcountrydriver (Jeep 4-1-1)
“The Original Jeeps” By Paul Bruno https://amzn.to/2SAqLNh
The Original Jeeps website https://www.originaljeeps.com

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The post Episode 458 - A Weak Point CAN Be a Good Thing! first appeared on Jeep Talk Show.

Episode 457 – The Illegitimate Leaf Spring


This episode brought to you in part by NEXEN Tire. Nexen tire has been around for 77 years. Nexen has made passenger and SUV tires along with street performance for many years, most recently have started making off road tires. The Nexen Roadian MTX is amazing long time off roaders with it’s all around fantastic performance in mud or rocks. Find out more about Nexen tires by going to Nexen tire u s a dot com right now. That’s https://nexentireusa.com.

 

This Week In Jeep: 

So it turns out Jeep CAN throw a curveball. What I mean by that is historically, the concept photos we see of upcoming Jeep vehicles are usually just that. Artist renditions of what it MIGHT look like. Or they come in the physical form like the ones we see every year at the easter Jeep safari. Jeeps so futuristic or purpose built, you can’t help but drool and daydream just looking at them. But deep down we all know that they will never see the light of an assembly line in Ohio. So it came as quite a shock when just this week it was confirmed by head of Jeep Jim Morrison that the Jeep Grand Wagoneer concept that was revealed in early September offered more than just a sneak peek at an upcoming production vehicle. Well, two of them, technically. By his own words, what you see is pretty much what you’ll get on showroom floors.  If you don’t know, Jeep will “soon” be launching an all-new Grand Wagoneer along with a Wagoneer that is also based on the concept but will carry both name badges. But what will set them apart? I mean comparatively, the Grand Cherokee is larger than the Cherokee, so the distinction has ALWAYS been real easy. Well according to the head of Jeep himself, Jim Morrison said in a recent press release, that the Grand, in this case, will mean trim level, the more premium trim to be more specific. We now have confirmation from Jeep that both trim levels will be offered in standard and long-wheelbase versions as well, just like the big SUVs from Ford and GM. This means the Wagoneer will compete with the Ford Expedition and Chevy Tahoe, while the Grand Wagoneer will match up against the Lincoln Navigator and Cadillac Escalade. Make sense? And really it’s no comparison, I can hear the JD Power awards getting engraved as we speak. Morrison also said that the concept pictures released by Jeep, represents the smaller model and is pretty much what you’ll see when the vehicles go on sale, save for some of the extensive exterior lighting accents and a few other small design touches. We still have yet to hear exactly WHEN we can expect to see these new Jeeps in dealerships, or even what powertrains will be behind the grille. And just because I get great joy in doing so, I’m going to SPOIL it for all you Easter egg hunters right now.  The grille on the Wagoneer that is about to be released… is canted at the exact same angle as the original Wagoneer grille was. The concept is also being billed as a plug-in hybrid, and multiple powertrain options are likely, along with three different four-wheel-drive systems that will provide increasing levels of off-road capability. Anxious to see one for yourself? So are we. As soon as they hit the showroom floors, we’ll let you know. 

Does This Picture “TRIGGER” you!?!?

Let me describe what you’re seeing. Mountain scenery, lots of shrubs, bushes and trees surround this wide pathway leading to what looks like a larger trail with a trailhead marker and a sign post. So we have a mountain, some plants, a trail, a Jeep and a sign. What’s the big deal right? Honestly, if you are the person who even has triggers, we probably can’t be friends. Ordinarily I don’t like to call people out. Ordinarily, I keep to myself, or otherwise leave people to their own opinions and devices. Oh sure I like to give advice and I’m definitely the kind of person that will lend a hand or help someone out. And yes, I’ve even been known to get a little enthusiastic here on the show… But when I came across this drivel of an article, I had to put my finger to the keyboard and draft a reply.  The editorial, if it could even be considered as such, is a crying testament to the growing pussification of this nation by the exponential increase of people like the author, who are upset, disgusted, utterly offended if not outraged by virtually anything that interrupts the world they’ve created inside their perfect little bubble. The sound of a dirt bike or smell of a cheeseburger, a difference of opinion, a questioning of facts or god forbid an environmentally destructive Jeep Cherokee out in the wilderness! … GASP!  I know… oh the horror! For most of us this is a common sight, one might go so far as to say that Jeep, ANY Jeep “belongs” out in nature and not shackled to the white and yellow stripes of the black topped super slabs of the concrete jungle. But when this Zack Floss snowflake came prancing down his favorite skipping trail, and saw a Jeep next to this protected wilderness trail head, he bout filled his romper right then and there. His column goes on and on about the audacity and brash carelessness that seems to be on the rise with these Jeep owners. He cries and whines endlessly like his beloved nature has somehow been viciously raped in front of his very eyes by the mere sight of this vehicle in these protected lands. He can’t even fathom or wrap his head around the fact that he is seeing a vehicle where he is seeing it. Seriously, there’s like two paragraphs just on that. And endless babbling painting this picture of how if something isn’t done to stop these eco-hating villains that the world as we know it will come crashing down around us in a fiery hell of gasoline, tires and exhaust fumes. All because the Jeep owner, who just so happened to be a veteran – and we’ll come back to that in a second – drove past a gate thinking it was an open trail. I’ll be the first to agree that he was in the wrong, and shouldn’t have been there. Alcohol didn’t seem to be a factor, and since captain snowflake reported the Jeep owner speaking with a Ranger, we can assume there was a degree of negligence in knowing how to read a trailhead marker. All that being said, who the hell does this columnist think he is coming out with paragraph after paragraph of righteous indignation over a simple, harmless accident involving a little oversight, and nothing else. But to insinuate that there was malice and intent behind this Jeep being up on a mountain… on a trail… that (by his own words) was big enough for an emergency vehicle, goes way beyond bad journalism and delves right into the realm of libel. Yes the guy shouldn’t have been there, but unlike the jeep that was stuck on the top of a mountain on a BIKE TRAIL, this involved much less ignorance and stupidity. Sure there was some “stupid” to-go-around, but to then to put it out there in what was such a gross display of a lack of control one has over their emotions I’m surprised the Adirondack Daily Enterprise has not fired this yahoo for this degree of gross unprofessionalism. I believe the term is “making a mountain out of a molehill”  … which is the understatement of the year as literally HALF the article is him bashing vets in one sentence using terms for the armed services of this nation like insidious force for neo-colonial exploitation, but then in the very next sentence tries to save face by referring to them as staunch defenders of democracy and freedom around the world. But only under the context that they had sacrificed life limb and mental health. He desperately backtracks by going on for another two or three paragraphs about objectivity and the importance of seeing both sides of any story. Yea, sure pal, but we can read between the lines here, you’re not fooling anyone. And if anyone wants this guy’s email address to share a piece of your mind with him like I did, I’ll be happy to give it to ya. ZACK FLOSS

Newbie Nuggets:

With so many trails shut down due to fires, or forest service closing them for precautions, I figured if you needed something to do, why not do an inspection of your jeep and make sure it’s all ready to go when the trails open back up. We have discussed inspecting your jeep after a trail run (episode 436 & 443) but today I wanted to suggest a more thorough inspection. Not on the trail but in your driveway and with no time constraint. Since you can’t do a run why not inspect and really check out your jeep. Here are the items my husband checked on our jeep. Now the more extreme runs dictate a more thorough inspection so easy runs are not as detailed. If you only drive fire roads or use your jeep as your daily driver then this list is for you; Check for visible leaks of any fluids. If your jeep has been sitting, this should be an easy check. If there is fluid on the ground, you have an issue, if not you may be in the clear. Leaks could be oil, coolant, power steering, fuel, brake fluid, or rodents that you may have run over last month. Next, recheck your tire pressures. When you air up at the end of the trail before hitting the HWY, most people use a compressor. Compressing air heats and expands the air, plus the working compressor gets hot, further heating and expanding the air. If you inflate your tires to 30 PSI, by the time you get home, it has cooled, and you may see lower pressures just due to the cooler air condensing and “shrinking” in volume which equates to lower tire pressures. Also, not as critical, but if you were at altitude when you aired up and drove down to sea level or there are thousands of feet elevation change from beginning to end, it will affect your pressures. Ambient air pressure (14.7 psi at sea level vs 12.2 psi at 5,000 ft) and temperature affects the overall tire pressure. It’s usually best to recheck the tires the morning after you return from a run once they have had a chance to acclimate to your typical altitude and temperatures. Just good to check since the jeep has been sitting. If you generally run more extreme wheeling you will want to check the above plus these added items; Besides tire pressure, check for other issues with our tires. If you were skating against rocks with low tire pressures it may be possible to grind the rocks into grit that possibly ends up between your wheel’s rim and the bead of your tire. This could create enough space for air to escape at a very slow rate. Really annoying. We also look for gouges, typically on the side walls, that may develop into a failure.  If you aired your tires down properly, they should wrap around and absorb most sharp objects, but, it’s better to discover this in your driveway instead of your morning commute or next run. Next we look for mechanical failures or stresses. Bill has found more things ready to fail by roaming around under the Jeep on his back or on a creeper. Which by the way is a great tool to use if you have enough ground clearance. Look at the shocks. Do they appear to be leaking? Are the shafts bent, are the attachments loose or missing bolts. Maybe you bounced off a rock just enough to dent the housing. Not good. While looking for leaks, if you still have stock differential covers and have been doing a little rock ballet, it’s possible to “peel” back your diff cover just enough to cause a slow leak. Really annoying on your driveway or garage floor, but more importantly, if you run your diff dry, it’ll be REALLY expensive to fix. And, of course, the “while you’re in there” phrase always drives the price and time off the trail way up. And a quick side note to all you new JL owners: it’s a good idea to check your diff. drain plugs because a lot of them are coming loose from the factory. Next take a look at the suspension components. Most times you can ride a rock with a lower control arm and it will only scratch it. However, extreme flexing will really stress the rubber grommets at the ends of the control arms. We had a kit that didn’t come with upper control arms. So, when we flexed the stock upper control arms while rock crawling the upper control arms were used beyond their normal design duty. We had to replace the front upper control arm rear bushings at the frame a couple of times. And, as we all know, anything loose in the front suspension on a Jeep gets really exciting at 40-50 MPH when the “death wobble” rears its ugly head. That’s why we finally went with Rock Jock adjustable upper control arms with Johnny Joints. These things are stout!  They are fully adjustable billet control arms. They allow us to adjust the caster on the front axle after lifting it 4”. Big advantage. Also, we haven’t had a single issue with joint attachment failures. Proper axle alignment will be a discussion in an upcoming episode. We also check ball joints, tie rod ends, drag link ends, steering box slop or “play.”  If you do enough off-roading, these items will eventually wear out, leading back to the dreaded “death wobble.” Another thing to look for is where the front driveshaft is closest to the automatic transmission as it extends from the front of the transfer case to the front axle pinion yoke.  I’m not sure about the later JK’s or JL’s but the 2007-2011 have a clearance issue when slightly lifted and extreme flexing. When you flex your front axle, the driveshaft contacts the transmission. The first thing that happens is the drive shaft dust boot gets ripped off. Then the driveshaft will actually hit the transmission enough to peel the pan away from the body of the transmission and next thing you know, you got a leak. This can be remedied with a quality after-market driveshaft like the one from JE Reel we have sitting on the bench waiting for installation. So, these are just a few things to look for. There are lots that can wear, loosen, bend, break and leak. It’s a machine and requires inspection and maintenance so that you get many miles and service out of it. You can’t always depend on your local shop to find all these things in a typical service. Sometimes it’s a cost issue. It’s not just a lube, oil and filter. It takes someone with the knowledge of what to look for and that takes time. Time is money so depending on your level of mechanical abilities you may want to save some money and do these inspections yourself. You can always take the jeep into a mechanic and tell them what you found, rather than say ‘hey can you inspect my jeep and tell me if I have any issues that need fixed?” Yeah, that would cost you a bunch. If you have mechanical abilities I think it’s a great idea to inspect your Jeep yourself. It costs less, you begin to understand what’s going on underneath your Jeep and you may gain the knowledge and experience needed to help out a fellow Jeeper on the trail that didn’t do their inspections before going back out on the trail. And you have the time right now so why not give it a try. Have fun, learn your vehicle, and prevent breakdowns and don’t forget that “while you’re in there…” could be a fun way to upgrade…..

Tech Talk With Jeep Talk: 

Chances are the leaf springs in the back of your Jeep Cherokee XJ are sagging more than grandma on a hot day. Obviously replacing them is the most straightforward option, but buying new ones can definitely get expensive and may be out of reach for many XJ owners. The solution? Bastard Packs, Franken Packs, or Franken-Leafs, they all mean the same thing. Pieces of other leaf spring packs joined together to create a whole new monster…. All you gotta do is head to a scrap yard and see what you can muster up.  You can take whole leaf packs from other Cherokees, or you can take springs from other vehicles and make stronger leaf packs. The Cherokee uses 2.5-inch wide leaves, which fortunately for you, is a pretty common size. These are used on Jeep Comanchees, the Dodge Dakota and Durango, Ford’s Ranger, and the Chevy S-10, so there should be plenty of choices when it comes to the donor vehicles. Keep the main leaf from your Cherokee, but don’t be afraid to throw the rest of it out.  The less difference in length between the leaves, the more rigid it will be. The more difference in leaf lengths, and you will get more flex, but possibly less lift. Regardless of how you build the pack, you will see at least SOME lift, unless you just rebuild it in stock form. Otherwise you can expect to see anywhere between 2 to 3.5 inches of lift depending on how you build the pack. And voila! …for a fraction of the price you just built yourself a set of new-to-you leafs ready to lift or improve the back end of your Jeep Cherokee XJ.

Jeep Life:

Tools Actually Used On The Trail

Hi guys. I had a great time visiting my kids this past weekend. I ended up taking one of those puddle jumpers from the valley to Denver instead of driving my Jeep and parking it at the airport. HOLY MOLY. That was scarier than Hell’s Revenge. I thought we were going to crash in the mountains. It was like a rollercoaster ride. However, on the way back the plane ride was one of the best I have ever been on. Okay on to the Jeep Life… So, it seems the theme lately has been about being prepared when you hit the trails. Being prepared by bringing the tools you may need while out wheeling on the trails. There are lists all over the internet for what you need to pack into your Jeep before begin your off road adventure.  Recovery gear and tools and camping equipment. I have also done several videos on YouTube like my top 5 recovery gear, top 5 tools, top 5 fluids etc. But what have I actually used while on those 4 x 4 trails? Let’s start with the first time I broke my Jeep. I was wheeling at Rausch Creek and slammed into a rock. My steering went wacko and I could not turn. Turns out I knocked my steering stabilizer. I was a little freaked out… unnecessarily…  I did not realize at the time that you do not really need your steering stabilizer. So, the guys on the trail helped me take off the stabilizer and then when we got of the trail we put it back on. The only tool we needed for this was an 18 mm wrench. For the JK’s and JKU’s this is a must have tool in your toolbox. As I began wheeling more difficult trails my recovery gear became super useful.  Not for me tony but others who needed a tow or a tug. I have used my recovery strap, tree saver, d ring, soft shackle and snatch block quite off often. My favorite being the soft shackle.  And my Winch. I used it several times on the Rubicon Trail. Okay Tony so yes, I used it once getting myself up over a waterfall in Arizona. I was super stuck. After a 59 point turn, I was in between a rock and a rock. So, pulling myself up over that waterfall I needed two more “tools” the Hi-lift jack and a Colby valve. I had tore my valve stem. The air started leaking from the tire and Pop! I lost the bead. My Jeep was in a very precarious spot on the rocks and changing the tire was going to be extremely dangerous. Luckily another Jeeper had a Colby valve and it was a super quick easy repair. Pull out the old valve stem and twist in the Colby Valve. I know keep several of them in my Jeep. During my adventures with Neil and our shakedown runs with the Jeeps we flip, we have used different Pry bars, ratchet straps, extra u joints, ratchet, and sockets and a bfh. A Big Effing hammer. Banging over the rocks plays havoc on those parts underneath the Jeep. Those ratchet straps can hold your Jeep together until you get it off the trail. The cool thing about the Jeep community is You may not have it all together but together you will have it all. Don’t get too crazy trying to pack everything and the kitchen sink into your Jeep. It’s good to be prepared. You may not use everything you bring and you may not have everything you need, but you may have things others need and vice versa. Every time you go out you will learn what works for you and your style of wheeling. Just prepare the best you can and grow on that each time. You can head over to my blog JeepMomma.com and my Youtube channel. I have shared several videos on posts on things to bring with you on the trail. Next week I will share the items I use while camping and the items that just sit in my Jeep or bin and I never take out.

Interview with:

Amy Garnat with CORVA California Off-Road Vehicle Association https://corva.org/

Amy is Managing Director of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association, celebrating 50 years of representing off-roaders at all levels of government. Amy was the recipient of the 2019 Impact Award from the Off Road Motorsports Hall of Fame in the advocacy category. The group is composed of off-road enthusiasts of street legal and off highway registered vehicles such as ATV’s, motorcycles, 3-wheelers, trail bikes, and dune buggies, as well as 4X4 vehicles, dual sport motorcycles, Baja buggies, and desert racers. Plus many others that use motorized access for; hunting, rockhounding, bird watching, fishing and others activities.  CORVA’s main purpose is to work with the land managers for responsible off-highway vehicular access and recreation opportunities. Secondarily, we educate our membership on the constantly changing rules and regulations and promote clean-up and trail maintenance projects.

Campfire Side Chat:

Each week we invite you, the listener to join us around the virtual campfire.  This week we had, Greg L. Tammy, Nathan P. Travis E., Chris, Larry H. and Sean.  The topic for this weeks campfire discussion; Aluminum vs Steel Armor Weight vs Strength,  Which would you choose?  You can join our virtual campfire by subscribing to our newsletter and/or watching for posts on our Facebook Page (https://jeeptalkshow.com/newsletter https://facebook.com/jeeptalkshow)

Links Mentioned in this Episode: 

https://nexentireusa.com/tires/roadian_mtx
https://www.hellwigproducts.com/off-road/
https://www.corva.org/

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The post Episode 457 - The Illegitimate Leaf Spring first appeared on Jeep Talk Show.

Episode 456 – Leaf Spring Repair Kit from Hellwig


This episode brought to you in part by NEXEN Tire. Nexen tire has been around for 77 years. Nexen has made passenger and SUV tires along with street performance for many years, most recently have started making off road tires. The Nexen Roadian MTX is amazing long time off roaders with it’s all around fantastic performance in mud or rocks. Find out more about Nexen tires by going to Nexen tire u s a dot com right now. That’s https://nexentireusa.com.

This Week In Jeep: 

Where’s The Wood On The New Waggy?

What are two things most people think of when they hear the words “Grand Wagoneer” It’s usually “Big Jeep” and “Wood Trim” … but when it came time to revive the name for a brand-new 2021 concept, designers chose to go against it. But why? I originally thought that Jeep was pandering to the tree huggers, but then I dug a little deeper. The era where vehicles wore wood panels on their flanks carried through nearly three decades between the ’60s and ’80s. And even before that, automakers thought “woody” wagons, with part of their body actually made of real wood, were a stylish way to show off the craftsmanship of the vehicle. Fiat Chrysler considered sticking the design element on the new Grand Wagoneer Concept, and even tried to implement it in a way that emulated the Wagoneers of the past. But it didn’t quite work. At least to some. I personally liked some of the artist renderings of the concept that DID include a nod to the old waggy’s of the past. Apparently the original wood side trim on the Wagoneers was contact paper with a vinyl that was applied to the side of the old Jeep. It looked OK, and it made a statement, but they were desperately trying to establish a sense of luxury, which wood at the time was how you did it. Today’s design and manufacturing standards are using vastly different tools and design elements to get the “this is a luxury vehicle” message across to anyone who lays eyes on a vehicle. So, in that spirit, FCA decided that putting wood on the NEW Wagoneer would have actually just cheapened it, instead of highlighting the luxury aspects of the new full size Jeep. While the wood-grain would have been a fun throwback, it may have been at odds with today’s standards of what a luxury vehicle is supposed to exude from the outside. I’m pretty sure we have all seen those 20 and 30 year old vehicles rolling around, where the fake wood has fallen off the outside. It looks like crap, and I’m sure I’m not speaking out of turn when I say that I’m sure Jeep wants to keep its new Wagoneer as far away from the “crap” moniker as possible. So while the sides of the new Grand Wagoneer will be devoid of wood, there could be a subtle throwback to that golden era if the teakwood headlight and roof rail accents make production, along with the real wood that we are told will adorn much of the interior.

Actual Jeep Customer Care Program Good For 3 Years of Free Maintenance

Did you know that the Jeep brand will be turning 80 years old in 2021? That’s a real thing! Not fake news! So to celebrate, the automaker is expanding its Jeep Wave Customer Care program. Now everyone who purchases a new 2021 Jeep will get this perk. The program gives three years of free maintenance, 24/7 phone and online support, trip interruption and first-day rental coverage, and, for the adventurous, VIP access to “select exclusive Jeep brand events,” that I would be surprised if they didn’t include some off-roading. There are no exceptions in the lineup this time either. The deal includes ALL 2021 Jeep vehicles. For those looking for something to mark the occasion, the automaker is also offering up special 80th-anniversary-edition vehicles. They’ll be equipped with “unique wheels, grille accents, and commemorative badging to set them apart from the rest of the Jeeps on the lot. If you or someone you know may be interested in seeing or test driving any of the new 80th anniversary Jeeps… the special-edition versions will land in showrooms by the end of this year.

Jeep Life:

Shackle Confession

My Shackle Confession…Finally I admit my shackle wasn’t stolen.  I am going to talk to you about wheel spin, and why it is a bad thing for several reasons. As responsible off-road enthusiasts, we want to do our best to minimize trail damage. Trail damage is one of the reasons we are getting our trails shut down. Sometimes off roaders may not be aware that certain types of wheeling is damaging our community, our trails and their own Jeeps. They see a type of wheeling on YouTube… by off road leaders, or others doing it out on the trails, and they think it is okay. Well, wheel spin is one of those types of wheeling that is bad for your Jeep… and our trails.  Just because you see a high-profile YouTuber doing it does not make it right. The off-road community is being looked at with scrutiny nowadays, so we all need to be on our best behavior so as to not give the government any reason to close any more of our trails.  Our trails are under fire. They are being closed across the country for several reasons. One of those is irresponsible wheeling that is destroying our trails There are many ways to destroy the trails and excessive wheel spin is just one. Excessive wheel spin is irresponsible wheeling.  The organization Treadlightly.org says, “How we wheel today affects how we can wheel tomorrow and how are children can wheel in the future.”  They also say every true 4 wheel drive enthusiast should know the basics of minimizing the impact on our great outdoors” Here are some ways to minimize the impact on our trails.  travel only in areas open to 4×4 vehicles – drive over not around obstacles to keep from widening the trails. Now I see a lot of this happening out on the trails where they are getting wider than originally intended. Unfortunately, this is due to speeding on the trails and a lot, not all of the time the culprit is the side by sides. So slow down and go over that obstacle  – straddle ruts, gullies & washouts even wider than the Jeep – Cross streams only where the road crosses the stream – when possible avoid mud in soft terrain, go easy on the gas to avoid wheel spin as it can cause rutting. So let’s stop there and talk about wheel spin and how reckless it is. What does excessive wheel spin do… it tears up soft terrain like mud and creates ruts, It also tears up the soft terrain of gravel and rocks. It shoots all that gravel and rock from the tires. This can be very dangerous when people are on the trail watching Jeeps wheel through obstacles. Some rocks can be flaky and wheel spin tears up that rock and changes the terrain and eventually that trail will get worn down. This can change a difficult trail to an easy trail.  Sometimes wheelers don’t know when to let up off that skinny pedal and the wheels continue to spin and then the rig starts bouncing and sliding which in some cases widens the trails which we want to avoid. The other part of this is excessive wheel spin puts your vehicle in harm’s way and can cause damage to your vehicle. As that rig bounces up in the air with the tires continually spinning… Once it comes down onto the ground it shock loads the suspension. That is not good. That is when axles and driveshafts break. You want to keep traction on those tires and you would be surprised by picking the right light and slowly crawling that obstacle you will make it. . So as I read on one website with Off Road tips. Don’t Spin To Win. Not only does such behavior tear up the trails, but it gives off-roading a bad name that can be used against us when environmentalists and disapproving lawmakers make regulations restricting our activity. For more on being a good steward of our trails head over to Treadlightly.org.

Tech Talk With Jeep Talk: 

The Benefits and Dangers of a Dual Battery System

As the cooler weather starts to set in, we are reminded about the electrical needs of our Jeeps moving into the later months of the year. Colder weather usually means drained batteries, and hard starts. One of the best ways to avoid those slow starts, or coming out on a cold morning to find a dead Jeep is to install a dual battery system. This is something we’ve talked about several times here on the show. But when I start talking about running dual batteries outside of the show, most people assume I’m talking about a 24 volt system.  That’s not necessarily the case, especially in a conversation about Jeeps and not Semi Trucks. But having more voltage isn’t really the reason that you’d want to run a dual battery system. Most people want to run dual batteries because they want the power reserves, and raw amperage of two batteries to run their 12 volt system.  But how you hook them up makes all the difference in the world. So if you want 12 volts but the capacity of two batteries you need to hook them together the right way. And for our Jeeps, and virtually any other production vehicle except the aforementioned Semi-Trucks or some select BMW’s…. that means you need to hook up the batteries in parallel. What that means is that the negative of one battery connects to the negative of the other and the two positives go together. This can be done using bus bars, thick strips of metal specifically sized to span and mount onto the battery terminals, or with regular battery cables with terminals on each end. Then you will use the positive of one battery as your positive output, and the negative of the other battery as the ground.  What you got then at this point is still 12 volts, but with the capacity and amperage of two batteries. This is perfect for if you’re running a winch or lots of off-road lights, a big stereo system or anything that sucks a lot of power. What’s even better is that your alternator will still charge both of these batteries, and do it at the same time. There is one CRITICAL piece of information here that absolutely must be followed.  And that is that you need to make sure the two batteries match so that they don’t draw on each other and discharge. That means brand for brand, amp for amp.  Now if you DO want 24-volts you need to hook the batteries up in a series which means the negative of one battery connects to the positive of the other battery. Then the same as before, you use the positive of one battery and the negative of the other. When you hook up two batteries in series like this, the voltage of the two batteries is added together and you’ve got 24 volts. But,  you need to be careful, you do NOT want to do this with the batteries still connected in any way whatsoever to the vehicle’s wiring.  24-volts will do some serious damage to a 12-volt system so you need to make sure you’re hooking things up right. So why might you want 24 volts if it’s so dangerous to the Jeep? You’ve probably heard me talk about how to set up a welder for trail side repairs by using a pair of jumper cables, a set of vice grips, and a welding stick. The voltage of two or even 3 batteries hooked together in series will provide plenty of juice to wled just about anything together. Be advised though, this is hard on the batteries and I don’t suggest welding for long periods with them hooked up like this as the massive draw, and near dead short condition can damage the batteries over time. So the next time the Jeep is ready for a new battery, think about getting one of those dual stack battery trays. They bolt right in and at just 100 to 150 bucks, they are an affordable way to give you immediate room to run your own dual battery system.

Newbie Nuggets:

Root fires

After last week’s fireside chat about overlanding, and all the fires the west coast has endured over the past several weeks, and all our forest service trails closed in our state, I got to thinking about an issue that would be good to discuss. When you travel with your jeep and overland, or camp out in the middle of nowhere, and you want to have a fire for warmth, or roasting marshmallows, please consider the following: My Dad is a retired fireman and arson investigator and has some firsthand knowledge about this issue. When you build that campfire “ring” for your camping needs, or use one that someone else made, have you considered your location? I know you probably won’t make a fire underneath a tree, or low hanging branches – that seems common sense to most of us but have you considered what’s underneath the ring you made? I’m talking about root fires. Root fires are dangerous fires that start underground with tree roots that you cannot see. They can smolder for months underground long after the surface part of the fire has been extinguished. With abundant fuel and plenty of oxygen, a root fire travels underground and eventually surfaces elsewhere as an above-ground fire. You douse the fire at night or early morning and head out about your day with no care or consideration of what could happen. The fire got so hot that it literally caught the roots underneath on fire and can last days, weeks, even months in some areas and travel slowly along the root system until it finds a stump, or tree and a tiny bit of oxygen and BAM you have a fire in the forest. There have been studies and cases where the fire erupted so far away from the fire ring that it took a while to determine that the “ring” was the cause. Having fires at all during the “fire season”, yes we have a season  on the west coast, is about as dumb as ever. Just look at the news and all the destruction. I wonder how many of these fires are a result of a fire ring not placed in a proper location. We had a fire here in Big Bear a few years ago on a trail called Jacoby Canyon. This was one of the most breathtaking trails with a canopy of trees overhead, creeks with running water that you crossed and overall a fabulous trail. Hikers made a campfire a ways away from this trail and didn’t extinguish it properly that morning. They left and continued walking the Pacific Crest Trail and the next day, fire erupts and completely destroys this beautiful area. They traced the origin back to this fire ring. Careless on their part and they probably never knew they were the cause of the fire!! And they never found out who they were. Campsites that have designated fire rings, tend to be placed where there are no roots or tree system to “catch” fire. It’s the people venturing out into the “wild” blue yonder without a care in the world, enjoying their jeep life, exploring the areas and having a campfire. Nothing wrong with exploring and camping out in nature. But PLEASE be smart; -Please do not build a fire during fire season – in any part of the US. Drought conditions help aid in underground root fires. -If you build a “fire ring” it is suggested you dig down about 11 inches to make sure there are no roots in that area. Most trees have roots out to their leaves however others travel far to seek water and could be quite a ways away from the trunk. Use sand to build the base and make sure to add rocks around the ring to help keep the fire contained. -Another suggestion if you need to build one of these rings is to lay a fire resistant cloth on the ground and then pile mineral sand, like beach or stream bed sand on top of it. Once the mound is created, you build a fire on top of it, instead of bare ground. The mound creates an insulation barrier that prevents the ground under the fire from being scorched and preserves the micro-organisms or plants living there. The mound also prevents root fires because it stops the propagation of the fire below the fire resistant cloth. I’m not sure how many jeepers or over landers will actually carry a fire resistant cloth, let alone pack it up and take it with them as they travel. But this is an alternative to setting a forest on fire. -If you build a fire, please make sure to extinguish it completely – not just smothering the fire, but completely out with lots of water – then verify there are no embers glowing underneath. It truly is a matter of life AND Death!! The forest, the wild animals and nature depend on us to preserve it. Leave the forest the way you found it – pristine! Josh, Tony, I know we are safe around our fireside chat each week with the zoom people, but did you know about the root fires?

Interview with:

Mike Hallmark of Hellwigproducts.com

Mike Hallmark is the International Sales and Marketing Manager at Hellwig Products. Hellwig Products is a world class suspension manufacturer that produces sway bars and helper springs. Founded in 1946, Hellwig provides load and sway control for all types of vehicles, everything from Jeeps to firetrucks and RVs. An off-road and overland enthusiast, Mike owns a collection of vehicles, including a 1948 Willys CJ-2A (Willis) that he took wheeling in Moab at the Easter Jeep Safari in 2019. When he’s

 not in Willis, Mike is spending time in his classic Land Rover and fleet of vintage Volkswagens. Mike has been in the aftermarket automotive industry for 15 years and currently sits on the SEMA TORA (Truck and Off Road Alliance) council. For information on the worlds best load and sway control products head to www.hellwigproducts.com.

Spring Sling! Broken Leaf Spring emergency repair Kit. Best Insurance for getting your vehicle home or to a repair shop when you crack a spring. Simple Bolt on Installation with basic hand tools.

Must Have Stuff:

Lifetime LED Light Bar Cover 50″ no More Whistle Made in USA

Some States now require you to have your light bars covered.  It is the law, so don’t get pulled over because you did not cover your bar!!! The Lifetime 50 ” light bar cover fits most dual row light bars up to 52″. They are made of waterproof polyurethane backed UV protected polyester with 1/4″ open cell foam backing for a cleaner fit and extra protection. Guaranteed to not fade for 3 years minimum. These covers will not turn that ugly Purple that other brands do. Made in the USA https://amzn.to/3mM4nOZ     $69.00 – FREE Shipping

Campfire Side Chat:

Nobody likes a skinny Jeep, well maybe in some cases, like historical restorations, it’s ok. But i don’t know one fan of Jeeps, that doesn’t like a wide track look with big knobby tires sticking out to give the Jeep a nice wide stance. Some do it by swapping out the axles, some do it with specific types of wheels, others, opt for the wheel spacer. So… the question is…. Are they safe or dangerous? Would you or have you ran them before? Have you or someone you know had issues? Why do you think they may or may not be safe or unsafe? Guests around the virtual campfire! Chris, Greg, Isaac, Travis, Chip

Links Mentioned in this Episode:

Hellwig Suspension Products https://www.hellwigproducts.com/
Lifetime LED Light Bar Cover 50″ https://amzn.to/3mM4nOZ
NEXEN TIRE https://www.nexentireusa.com/tires/roadian_mtx

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The post Episode 456 - Leaf Spring Repair Kit from Hellwig first appeared on Jeep Talk Show.

Episode 456 – Leaf Spring Repair Kit from Hellwig


This episode brought to you in part by NEXEN Tire. Nexen tire has been around for 77 years. Nexen has made passenger and SUV tires along with street performance for many years, most recently have started making off road tires. The Nexen Roadian MTX is amazing long time off roaders with it’s all around fantastic performance in mud or rocks. Find out more about Nexen tires by going to Nexen tire u s a dot com right now. That’s https://nexentireusa.com.

This Week In Jeep: 

Where’s The Wood On The New Waggy?

What are two things most people think of when they hear the words “Grand Wagoneer” It’s usually “Big Jeep” and “Wood Trim” … but when it came time to revive the name for a brand-new 2021 concept, designers chose to go against it. But why? I originally thought that Jeep was pandering to the tree huggers, but then I dug a little deeper. The era where vehicles wore wood panels on their flanks carried through nearly three decades between the ’60s and ’80s. And even before that, automakers thought “woody” wagons, with part of their body actually made of real wood, were a stylish way to show off the craftsmanship of the vehicle. Fiat Chrysler considered sticking the design element on the new Grand Wagoneer Concept, and even tried to implement it in a way that emulated the Wagoneers of the past. But it didn’t quite work. At least to some. I personally liked some of the artist renderings of the concept that DID include a nod to the old waggy’s of the past. Apparently the original wood side trim on the Wagoneers was contact paper with a vinyl that was applied to the side of the old Jeep. It looked OK, and it made a statement, but they were desperately trying to establish a sense of luxury, which wood at the time was how you did it. Today’s design and manufacturing standards are using vastly different tools and design elements to get the “this is a luxury vehicle” message across to anyone who lays eyes on a vehicle. So, in that spirit, FCA decided that putting wood on the NEW Wagoneer would have actually just cheapened it, instead of highlighting the luxury aspects of the new full size Jeep. While the wood-grain would have been a fun throwback, it may have been at odds with today’s standards of what a luxury vehicle is supposed to exude from the outside. I’m pretty sure we have all seen those 20 and 30 year old vehicles rolling around, where the fake wood has fallen off the outside. It looks like crap, and I’m sure I’m not speaking out of turn when I say that I’m sure Jeep wants to keep its new Wagoneer as far away from the “crap” moniker as possible. So while the sides of the new Grand Wagoneer will be devoid of wood, there could be a subtle throwback to that golden era if the teakwood headlight and roof rail accents make production, along with the real wood that we are told will adorn much of the interior.

Actual Jeep Customer Care Program Good For 3 Years of Free Maintenance

Did you know that the Jeep brand will be turning 80 years old in 2021? That’s a real thing! Not fake news! So to celebrate, the automaker is expanding its Jeep Wave Customer Care program. Now everyone who purchases a new 2021 Jeep will get this perk. The program gives three years of free maintenance, 24/7 phone and online support, trip interruption and first-day rental coverage, and, for the adventurous, VIP access to “select exclusive Jeep brand events,” that I would be surprised if they didn’t include some off-roading. There are no exceptions in the lineup this time either. The deal includes ALL 2021 Jeep vehicles. For those looking for something to mark the occasion, the automaker is also offering up special 80th-anniversary-edition vehicles. They’ll be equipped with “unique wheels, grille accents, and commemorative badging to set them apart from the rest of the Jeeps on the lot. If you or someone you know may be interested in seeing or test driving any of the new 80th anniversary Jeeps… the special-edition versions will land in showrooms by the end of this year.

Jeep Life:

Shackle Confession

My Shackle Confession…Finally I admit my shackle wasn’t stolen.  I am going to talk to you about wheel spin, and why it is a bad thing for several reasons. As responsible off-road enthusiasts, we want to do our best to minimize trail damage. Trail damage is one of the reasons we are getting our trails shut down. Sometimes off roaders may not be aware that certain types of wheeling is damaging our community, our trails and their own Jeeps. They see a type of wheeling on YouTube… by off road leaders, or others doing it out on the trails, and they think it is okay. Well, wheel spin is one of those types of wheeling that is bad for your Jeep… and our trails.  Just because you see a high-profile YouTuber doing it does not make it right. The off-road community is being looked at with scrutiny nowadays, so we all need to be on our best behavior so as to not give the government any reason to close any more of our trails.  Our trails are under fire. They are being closed across the country for several reasons. One of those is irresponsible wheeling that is destroying our trails There are many ways to destroy the trails and excessive wheel spin is just one. Excessive wheel spin is irresponsible wheeling.  The organization Treadlightly.org says, “How we wheel today affects how we can wheel tomorrow and how are children can wheel in the future.”  They also say every true 4 wheel drive enthusiast should know the basics of minimizing the impact on our great outdoors” Here are some ways to minimize the impact on our trails.  travel only in areas open to 4×4 vehicles – drive over not around obstacles to keep from widening the trails. Now I see a lot of this happening out on the trails where they are getting wider than originally intended. Unfortunately, this is due to speeding on the trails and a lot, not all of the time the culprit is the side by sides. So slow down and go over that obstacle  – straddle ruts, gullies & washouts even wider than the Jeep – Cross streams only where the road crosses the stream – when possible avoid mud in soft terrain, go easy on the gas to avoid wheel spin as it can cause rutting. So let’s stop there and talk about wheel spin and how reckless it is. What does excessive wheel spin do… it tears up soft terrain like mud and creates ruts, It also tears up the soft terrain of gravel and rocks. It shoots all that gravel and rock from the tires. This can be very dangerous when people are on the trail watching Jeeps wheel through obstacles. Some rocks can be flaky and wheel spin tears up that rock and changes the terrain and eventually that trail will get worn down. This can change a difficult trail to an easy trail.  Sometimes wheelers don’t know when to let up off that skinny pedal and the wheels continue to spin and then the rig starts bouncing and sliding which in some cases widens the trails which we want to avoid. The other part of this is excessive wheel spin puts your vehicle in harm’s way and can cause damage to your vehicle. As that rig bounces up in the air with the tires continually spinning… Once it comes down onto the ground it shock loads the suspension. That is not good. That is when axles and driveshafts break. You want to keep traction on those tires and you would be surprised by picking the right light and slowly crawling that obstacle you will make it. . So as I read on one website with Off Road tips. Don’t Spin To Win. Not only does such behavior tear up the trails, but it gives off-roading a bad name that can be used against us when environmentalists and disapproving lawmakers make regulations restricting our activity. For more on being a good steward of our trails head over to Treadlightly.org.

Tech Talk With Jeep Talk: 

The Benefits and Dangers of a Dual Battery System

As the cooler weather starts to set in, we are reminded about the electrical needs of our Jeeps moving into the later months of the year. Colder weather usually means drained batteries, and hard starts. One of the best ways to avoid those slow starts, or coming out on a cold morning to find a dead Jeep is to install a dual battery system. This is something we’ve talked about several times here on the show. But when I start talking about running dual batteries outside of the show, most people assume I’m talking about a 24 volt system.  That’s not necessarily the case, especially in a conversation about Jeeps and not Semi Trucks. But having more voltage isn’t really the reason that you’d want to run a dual battery system. Most people want to run dual batteries because they want the power reserves, and raw amperage of two batteries to run their 12 volt system.  But how you hook them up makes all the difference in the world. So if you want 12 volts but the capacity of two batteries you need to hook them together the right way. And for our Jeeps, and virtually any other production vehicle except the aforementioned Semi-Trucks or some select BMW’s…. that means you need to hook up the batteries in parallel. What that means is that the negative of one battery connects to the negative of the other and the two positives go together. This can be done using bus bars, thick strips of metal specifically sized to span and mount onto the battery terminals, or with regular battery cables with terminals on each end. Then you will use the positive of one battery as your positive output, and the negative of the other battery as the ground.  What you got then at this point is still 12 volts, but with the capacity and amperage of two batteries. This is perfect for if you’re running a winch or lots of off-road lights, a big stereo system or anything that sucks a lot of power. What’s even better is that your alternator will still charge both of these batteries, and do it at the same time. There is one CRITICAL piece of information here that absolutely must be followed.  And that is that you need to make sure the two batteries match so that they don’t draw on each other and discharge. That means brand for brand, amp for amp.  Now if you DO want 24-volts you need to hook the batteries up in a series which means the negative of one battery connects to the positive of the other battery. Then the same as before, you use the positive of one battery and the negative of the other. When you hook up two batteries in series like this, the voltage of the two batteries is added together and you’ve got 24 volts. But,  you need to be careful, you do NOT want to do this with the batteries still connected in any way whatsoever to the vehicle’s wiring.  24-volts will do some serious damage to a 12-volt system so you need to make sure you’re hooking things up right. So why might you want 24 volts if it’s so dangerous to the Jeep? You’ve probably heard me talk about how to set up a welder for trail side repairs by using a pair of jumper cables, a set of vice grips, and a welding stick. The voltage of two or even 3 batteries hooked together in series will provide plenty of juice to wled just about anything together. Be advised though, this is hard on the batteries and I don’t suggest welding for long periods with them hooked up like this as the massive draw, and near dead short condition can damage the batteries over time. So the next time the Jeep is ready for a new battery, think about getting one of those dual stack battery trays. They bolt right in and at just 100 to 150 bucks, they are an affordable way to give you immediate room to run your own dual battery system.

Newbie Nuggets:

Root fires

After last week’s fireside chat about overlanding, and all the fires the west coast has endured over the past several weeks, and all our forest service trails closed in our state, I got to thinking about an issue that would be good to discuss. When you travel with your jeep and overland, or camp out in the middle of nowhere, and you want to have a fire for warmth, or roasting marshmallows, please consider the following: My Dad is a retired fireman and arson investigator and has some firsthand knowledge about this issue. When you build that campfire “ring” for your camping needs, or use one that someone else made, have you considered your location? I know you probably won’t make a fire underneath a tree, or low hanging branches – that seems common sense to most of us but have you considered what’s underneath the ring you made? I’m talking about root fires. Root fires are dangerous fires that start underground with tree roots that you cannot see. They can smolder for months underground long after the surface part of the fire has been extinguished. With abundant fuel and plenty of oxygen, a root fire travels underground and eventually surfaces elsewhere as an above-ground fire. You douse the fire at night or early morning and head out about your day with no care or consideration of what could happen. The fire got so hot that it literally caught the roots underneath on fire and can last days, weeks, even months in some areas and travel slowly along the root system until it finds a stump, or tree and a tiny bit of oxygen and BAM you have a fire in the forest. There have been studies and cases where the fire erupted so far away from the fire ring that it took a while to determine that the “ring” was the cause. Having fires at all during the “fire season”, yes we have a season  on the west coast, is about as dumb as ever. Just look at the news and all the destruction. I wonder how many of these fires are a result of a fire ring not placed in a proper location. We had a fire here in Big Bear a few years ago on a trail called Jacoby Canyon. This was one of the most breathtaking trails with a canopy of trees overhead, creeks with running water that you crossed and overall a fabulous trail. Hikers made a campfire a ways away from this trail and didn’t extinguish it properly that morning. They left and continued walking the Pacific Crest Trail and the next day, fire erupts and completely destroys this beautiful area. They traced the origin back to this fire ring. Careless on their part and they probably never knew they were the cause of the fire!! And they never found out who they were. Campsites that have designated fire rings, tend to be placed where there are no roots or tree system to “catch” fire. It’s the people venturing out into the “wild” blue yonder without a care in the world, enjoying their jeep life, exploring the areas and having a campfire. Nothing wrong with exploring and camping out in nature. But PLEASE be smart; -Please do not build a fire during fire season – in any part of the US. Drought conditions help aid in underground root fires. -If you build a “fire ring” it is suggested you dig down about 11 inches to make sure there are no roots in that area. Most trees have roots out to their leaves however others travel far to seek water and could be quite a ways away from the trunk. Use sand to build the base and make sure to add rocks around the ring to help keep the fire contained. -Another suggestion if you need to build one of these rings is to lay a fire resistant cloth on the ground and then pile mineral sand, like beach or stream bed sand on top of it. Once the mound is created, you build a fire on top of it, instead of bare ground. The mound creates an insulation barrier that prevents the ground under the fire from being scorched and preserves the micro-organisms or plants living there. The mound also prevents root fires because it stops the propagation of the fire below the fire resistant cloth. I’m not sure how many jeepers or over landers will actually carry a fire resistant cloth, let alone pack it up and take it with them as they travel. But this is an alternative to setting a forest on fire. -If you build a fire, please make sure to extinguish it completely – not just smothering the fire, but completely out with lots of water – then verify there are no embers glowing underneath. It truly is a matter of life AND Death!! The forest, the wild animals and nature depend on us to preserve it. Leave the forest the way you found it – pristine! Josh, Tony, I know we are safe around our fireside chat each week with the zoom people, but did you know about the root fires?

Interview with:

Mike Hallmark of Hellwigproducts.com

Mike Hallmark is the International Sales and Marketing Manager at Hellwig Products. Hellwig Products is a world class suspension manufacturer that produces sway bars and helper springs. Founded in 1946, Hellwig provides load and sway control for all types of vehicles, everything from Jeeps to firetrucks and RVs. An off-road and overland enthusiast, Mike owns a collection of vehicles, including a 1948 Willys CJ-2A (Willis) that he took wheeling in Moab at the Easter Jeep Safari in 2019. When he’s

 not in Willis, Mike is spending time in his classic Land Rover and fleet of vintage Volkswagens. Mike has been in the aftermarket automotive industry for 15 years and currently sits on the SEMA TORA (Truck and Off Road Alliance) council. For information on the worlds best load and sway control products head to www.hellwigproducts.com.

Spring Sling! Broken Leaf Spring emergency repair Kit. Best Insurance for getting your vehicle home or to a repair shop when you crack a spring. Simple Bolt on Installation with basic hand tools.

Must Have Stuff:

Lifetime LED Light Bar Cover 50″ no More Whistle Made in USA

Some States now require you to have your light bars covered.  It is the law, so don’t get pulled over because you did not cover your bar!!! The Lifetime 50 ” light bar cover fits most dual row light bars up to 52″. They are made of waterproof polyurethane backed UV protected polyester with 1/4″ open cell foam backing for a cleaner fit and extra protection. Guaranteed to not fade for 3 years minimum. These covers will not turn that ugly Purple that other brands do. Made in the USA https://amzn.to/3mM4nOZ     $69.00 – FREE Shipping

Campfire Side Chat:

Nobody likes a skinny Jeep, well maybe in some cases, like historical restorations, it’s ok. But i don’t know one fan of Jeeps, that doesn’t like a wide track look with big knobby tires sticking out to give the Jeep a nice wide stance. Some do it by swapping out the axles, some do it with specific types of wheels, others, opt for the wheel spacer. So… the question is…. Are they safe or dangerous? Would you or have you ran them before? Have you or someone you know had issues? Why do you think they may or may not be safe or unsafe? Guests around the virtual campfire! Chris, Greg, Isaac, Travis, Chip

Links Mentioned in this Episode:

Hellwig Suspension Products https://www.hellwigproducts.com/
Lifetime LED Light Bar Cover 50″ https://amzn.to/3mM4nOZ
NEXEN TIRE https://www.nexentireusa.com/tires/roadian_mtx

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The post Episode 456 - Leaf Spring Repair Kit from Hellwig first appeared on Jeep Talk Show.